Zinc, copper, and manganese intake and balance for adults consuming self-selected diets

K. Y. Patterson, Janet Teresa Holbrook, J. E. Bodner, J. L. Kelsay, J. C. Smith, C. Veillon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Twenty-eight adult men and women participated in a year-long study designed to determine accurately the nutrient intake of adults who lived at home and consumed self-selected diets. During four metabolic balance periods, 7 days each, corresponding to the seasons (spring, summer, fall, winter), duplicates of the diet, and all urine and feces were collected. Daily mean intakes for zinc and copper were 9.9 and 1.2 mg, respectively. These levels were less than the recommended daily intakes of 15 mg for zinc and 2 to 3 mg for copper. In contrast, the mean dietary intake of manganese was 3.0 mg/day which is within the suggested safe and adequate range of 2.5 to 5.0 mg. Metabolic balances were negative for all three elements possibly due to a reduction in food intake during the collection periods compared to the noncollection intervals. The collection of the duplicate diets apparently influenced the food intake during the collection weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1397-1403
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume40
Issue number6 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Manganese
manganese
Zinc
Copper
food intake
copper
zinc
Diet
Eating
diet
Recommended Dietary Allowances
nutrient intake
Feces
urine
feces
Urine
Food
winter
summer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Patterson, K. Y., Holbrook, J. T., Bodner, J. E., Kelsay, J. L., Smith, J. C., & Veillon, C. (1984). Zinc, copper, and manganese intake and balance for adults consuming self-selected diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 40(6 SUPPL.), 1397-1403.

Zinc, copper, and manganese intake and balance for adults consuming self-selected diets. / Patterson, K. Y.; Holbrook, Janet Teresa; Bodner, J. E.; Kelsay, J. L.; Smith, J. C.; Veillon, C.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 40, No. 6 SUPPL., 1984, p. 1397-1403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patterson, KY, Holbrook, JT, Bodner, JE, Kelsay, JL, Smith, JC & Veillon, C 1984, 'Zinc, copper, and manganese intake and balance for adults consuming self-selected diets', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 40, no. 6 SUPPL., pp. 1397-1403.
Patterson, K. Y. ; Holbrook, Janet Teresa ; Bodner, J. E. ; Kelsay, J. L. ; Smith, J. C. ; Veillon, C. / Zinc, copper, and manganese intake and balance for adults consuming self-selected diets. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1984 ; Vol. 40, No. 6 SUPPL. pp. 1397-1403.
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