Youth Withdrawal Moderates the Relationhips Between Neighborhood Factors and Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescence

Jill A. Rabinowitz, Deborah A.G. Drabick, Maureen D. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adolescents higher in temperamental withdrawal are at risk for anxiety and depressive symptoms; however, not all youth higher in withdrawal exhibit internalizing symptoms, suggesting that contextual factors may influence these relationships. We examined whether youth withdrawal moderates the relationships between neighborhood processes (crime, social cohesion) and internalizing symptoms and whether findings were consistent with the diathesis-stress or differential susceptibility hypotheses. Participants were 775 adolescents (M = 15.50 ± 0.56 years, 72 % male, 76 % White). Adolescents higher in withdrawal manifested higher internalizing symptoms in the context of lower neighborhood crime and lower neighborhood social cohesion than youth lower in withdrawal, supporting diathesis-stress. These findings elucidate neighborhood processes associated with internalizing symptoms, which can inform models of risk and resilience for these symptoms among children who differ in temperamental withdrawal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-439
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety and depressive symptoms
  • Diathesis-stress
  • Differential susceptibility
  • Neighborhood crime
  • Neighborhood social cohesion
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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