Youth motorcycle-related brain injury by state helmet law type: United States, 2005-2007

Harold Weiss, Yll Agimi, Claudia Angelica Steiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Twenty-seven states have youth-specific helmet laws even though such laws have been shown to decrease helmet use and increase youth mortality compared with all-age (universal) laws. Our goal was to quantify the impact of age-specific helmet laws on youth under age 20 hospitalized with traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: Our cross-sectional ecological group analysis compared TBI proportions among US states with different helmet laws. We examined the following null hypothesis: If age-specific helmet laws are as effective as universal laws, there will be no difference in the proportion of hospitalized young motorcycle riders with TBI in the respective states. The data are derived from the 2005 to 2007 State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. We examined data for 17 states with universal laws, 6 states with laws for ages

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1149-1155
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume126
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motorcycles
Head Protective Devices
Brain Injuries
Health Care Costs
Inpatients
Databases
Mortality
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Helmet laws
  • Hospital discharges
  • Hospitalizations
  • Injury
  • Injury severity
  • Motorcycle
  • Motorcycle helmets
  • Non-traffic accidents
  • Scooters
  • Traffic accidents
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Youth motorcycle-related brain injury by state helmet law type : United States, 2005-2007. / Weiss, Harold; Agimi, Yll; Steiner, Claudia Angelica.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 126, No. 6, 12.2010, p. 1149-1155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiss, Harold ; Agimi, Yll ; Steiner, Claudia Angelica. / Youth motorcycle-related brain injury by state helmet law type : United States, 2005-2007. In: Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 126, No. 6. pp. 1149-1155.
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