Young Adult Victimization and Midlife Consequences: Sensitization or Steeling Effects of Childhood Adversity?

Elaine Eggleston Doherty, Brittany Jaecques, Kerry M. Green, Margaret Ensminger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The interrelationship between victimization, violence, and substance use/abuse has been well established, yet those who experience victimization do not necessarily respond with violence or substance use or escalate to experiencing substance abuse symptoms. Drawing on literature from both the syndemic research from medical anthropology and the resilience research from psychology, this study examines the interaction between early childhood adversity and young adult violent victimization on later substance use/abuse and violent offending to provide insight into conditional effects. Data are derived from the Woodlawn Study, an African American cohort of men and women from a socioeconomically heterogeneous community in the South Side of Chicago, who were followed from first grade through age 42. Results indicate that those with lower levels of childhood adversity are more likely to suffer the negative consequences of violent victimization than those with higher childhood adversity, providing support for a "steeling" effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-258
Number of pages20
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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sensitization
Crime Victims
victimization
young adult
Young Adult
childhood
Substance-Related Disorders
Violence
Medical Anthropology
abuse
psychology studies
violence
Research
African Americans
substance abuse
resilience
anthropology
school grade
Psychology
interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Law

Cite this

Young Adult Victimization and Midlife Consequences : Sensitization or Steeling Effects of Childhood Adversity? / Doherty, Elaine Eggleston; Jaecques, Brittany; Green, Kerry M.; Ensminger, Margaret.

In: Violence and Victims, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.04.2018, p. 239-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doherty, Elaine Eggleston ; Jaecques, Brittany ; Green, Kerry M. ; Ensminger, Margaret. / Young Adult Victimization and Midlife Consequences : Sensitization or Steeling Effects of Childhood Adversity?. In: Violence and Victims. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 239-258.
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