“You Take Medications, You Live Normally”: The Role of Antiretroviral Therapy in Mitigating Men’s Perceived Threats of HIV in Côte d’Ivoire

Zoe Hendrickson, Danielle A. Naugle, Natalie Tibbels, Abdul Dosso, Lynn M. Van Lith, Elizabeth C. Mallalieu, Diarra Kamara, Patricia Dailly-Ajavon, Adama Cisse, Kim Seifert Ahanda, Sereen Thaddeus, Stella Babalola, Christopher Hoffmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Men diagnosed with HIV face gender-related barriers to initiating and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This qualitative study (73 in-depth interviews; 28 focus group discussions), conducted with men in three urban sites in Côte d’Ivoire in 2016, examined perceptions of ART, including benefits and challenges, to explore how ART mitigates HIV’s threats to men’s sexuality, economic success, family roles, social status, and health. Participants perceived that adhering to ART would reduce risk of transmitting HIV to others, minimize job loss and lost productivity, and help maintain men’s roles as decision makers and providers. ART adherence was thought to help reduce the threat of HIV-related stigma, despite concerns about unintentional disclosure. While ART was perceived to improve health directly, it restricted men’s schedules. Side effects were also a major challenge. Social and behavior change approaches building on these insights may improve male engagement across the HIV care continuum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and behavior
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

HIV
Therapeutics
Continuity of Patient Care
Social Behavior
Disclosure
Sexuality
Focus Groups
Health Status
Appointments and Schedules
Economics
Interviews
Health

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Côte d’Ivoire
  • HIV
  • Masculinity
  • West Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

“You Take Medications, You Live Normally” : The Role of Antiretroviral Therapy in Mitigating Men’s Perceived Threats of HIV in Côte d’Ivoire. / Hendrickson, Zoe; Naugle, Danielle A.; Tibbels, Natalie; Dosso, Abdul; M. Van Lith, Lynn; Mallalieu, Elizabeth C.; Kamara, Diarra; Dailly-Ajavon, Patricia; Cisse, Adama; Seifert Ahanda, Kim; Thaddeus, Sereen; Babalola, Stella; Hoffmann, Christopher.

In: AIDS and behavior, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hendrickson, Zoe ; Naugle, Danielle A. ; Tibbels, Natalie ; Dosso, Abdul ; M. Van Lith, Lynn ; Mallalieu, Elizabeth C. ; Kamara, Diarra ; Dailly-Ajavon, Patricia ; Cisse, Adama ; Seifert Ahanda, Kim ; Thaddeus, Sereen ; Babalola, Stella ; Hoffmann, Christopher. / “You Take Medications, You Live Normally” : The Role of Antiretroviral Therapy in Mitigating Men’s Perceived Threats of HIV in Côte d’Ivoire. In: AIDS and behavior. 2019.
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