Worldwide perspectives on venom allergy

Peter Korošec, Thilo Jakob, Harfi Harb, Robert Heddle, Sarah Karabus, Ricardo de Lima Zollner, Julij Selb, Bernard Yu-Hor Thong, Fares Zaitoun, David B.K. Golden, Michael Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Venom immunotherapy is the standard of care for people with severe reactions and has been proven to reduce risk of future anaphylactic events. There is a moral imperative to ensure production, supply and worldwide availability of locally relevant, registered, standardized commercial venom extracts for diagnosis and treatment. Insects causing severe immediate allergic reactions vary by region worldwide. The most common culprits include honeybees (Apis mellifera), social wasps including yellow jackets (Vespula and Dolichovespula), paper wasps (Polistes) and hornets (Vespa), stinging ants (Solenopsis, Myrmecia, Pachycondyla, and Pogonomyrmex), and bumblebees (Bombus). Insects with importance in specific areas of the world include the Australian tick (Ixodes holocyclus), the kissing bug (Triatoma spp), horseflies (Tabanus spp), and mosquitoes (Aedes, Culex, Anopheles). Reliable access to high quality venom immunotherapy to locally relevant allergens is not available throughout the world. Many current commercially available therapeutic vaccines have deficiencies, are not suitable for, or are unavailable in vast areas of the globe. New products are required to replace products that are unstandardized or inadequate, particularly whole-body extract products. New products are required for insects in which no current treatment options exist. Venom immunotherapy should be promoted throughout the world and the provision thereof be supported by health authorities, regulatory authorities and all sectors of the health care service.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100067
JournalWorld Allergy Organization Journal
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Immunotherapy
  • Insects
  • Venom
  • Venom immunotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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