Workability of patients with HIV/AIDS in Northern Vietnam: a societal perspective on the impact of treatment program

Bach Xuan Tran, Long Hoang Nguyen, Giang Thu Vu, Mercedes Fleming, Carl A Latkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Vietnam, the antiretroviral therapy (ART) program has been widely scaled up across the country since 2005, and now covers treatment for about half the HIV population. However, limited data exist about the workability and productivity outcome of ART in Vietnam. We aim to assess the employment status and work productivity among HIV patients taking ART in Northern Vietnam. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Hanoi and Nam Dinh with 1133 participants taking ART at the selected clinics. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire: General Health (WPAI-GH) was applied. We found that 23% of patients with HIV/AIDS reported overall work productivity loss, and 12% had activity impairment. Among those having a job, their monthly income, however, was significantly lower than national averages 2806 thousand VND vs. 4120 thousand VND). The average education level of participants was low, with only 41.61% having greater than secondary education. Health problems and lower CD4 cell counts decreased workability of the patients while having a more dependent family, being a smoker or having a later HIV stage was associated with being less likely to have a job. The rate of employment among HIV/AIDS patients in this study was high however incomes were substantially lower than average. This could be due to low education levels or social stigma regarding these patients. Vocational education programs and public awareness could empower the patients economically. Similarly, a number of social and behavioral problems were associated with decreasing the working rate and productivity. Addressing these health issues may improve productivity among patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Vietnam
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
productivity
HIV
Education
Therapeutics
health
Health
Vocational Education
income
Social Stigma
secondary education
level of education
cross-sectional study
Social Problems
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Cross-Sectional Studies
questionnaire
education

Keywords

  • antiretroviral
  • economic
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Vietnam
  • Workability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Workability of patients with HIV/AIDS in Northern Vietnam : a societal perspective on the impact of treatment program. / Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Vu, Giang Thu; Fleming, Mercedes; Latkin, Carl A.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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