Women, work and coronary heart disease

Prospective findings from the Framingham heart study

S. G. Haynes, M. Feinleib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of employment status and employment-related behaviors to the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Between 1965 and 1967, a psychosocial questionnaire was administered to 350 housewives, 387 working women (women who had been employed outside the home over one-half their adult years), and 580 men participating in the Framingham Heart Study. The respondents were 45 to 64 years of age and were followed for the development of CHD over the ensuing eight years. Regardless of employment status, women reported significantly more symptoms of emotional distress than men. Working women and men were more likely to report Type A behavior, ambitiousness, and marital disagreements than were housewives; working women experienced more job mobility than men and more daily stress and marital dissatisfaction than housewives or men. Working women did not have significantly higher incidence rates of CHD than housewives (7.8 vs 5.4 per cent, respectively). However, CHD rates were almost twice as great among women holding clerical jobs (10.6 per cent) as compared to housewives. The most significant predictors of CHD among clerical workers were: suppressed hostility, having a nonsupportive boss, and decreased job mobility. CHD rates were higher among working women who had ever married, especially among those who had raised three or more children. Among working women, clerical workers who had children and were married to blue collar workers who had children and were married to blue collar workers were at highest risk of developing CHD (21.3 per cent.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-141
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume70
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Working Women
Coronary Disease
Heart Rate
Hostility
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Women, work and coronary heart disease : Prospective findings from the Framingham heart study. / Haynes, S. G.; Feinleib, M.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1980, p. 133-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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