Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk

Ann V. Schwartz, Deborah E. Sellmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Older women with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk nonspine fractures. The higher risk of falling associated with diabetes partially accounts for this increased risk. Current evidence suggests that there may also be impairments of bone strength in type 2 diabetes that are not well captured by bone mineral density testing. There is limited observational evidence that poor glycemic control and the associated complications of peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy may increase fractures, falls, and bone loss. However, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. It remains to be elucidated whether treating diabetes and diabetic complications aggressively can alter skeletal health either directly or by preventing diabetic complications that contribute to falls and fractures. Health care professionals should be aware of the increased fracture risk among older women with diabetes and should ensure screening, treatment, and fall prevention strategies are appropriately implemented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-369
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume4
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Complications
Accidental Falls
Bone Fractures
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Bone Density
Delivery of Health Care
Bone and Bones
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Schwartz, A. V., & Sellmeyer, D. E. (2004). Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk. Current Diabetes Reports, 4(5), 364-369.

Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk. / Schwartz, Ann V.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 4, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 364-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schwartz, AV & Sellmeyer, DE 2004, 'Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk', Current Diabetes Reports, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 364-369.
Schwartz AV, Sellmeyer DE. Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk. Current Diabetes Reports. 2004 Oct;4(5):364-369.
Schwartz, Ann V. ; Sellmeyer, Deborah E. / Women, type 2 diabetes, and fracture risk. In: Current Diabetes Reports. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 364-369.
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