Women have a greater ventilatory responses to upper airway obstruction than men

L. E. Pichard, S. P. Patil, E. Gladmon, P. L. Smith, A. R. Schwartz, H. Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined whether gender specific differences exist in defending inspiratory tidal volumes in the face of upper airway obstruction. In normal weight- and aged-matched men (n=9) and women (n=9), we induced upper airway obstruction with inspiratory flow limitation during NREM sleep by exposing individuals to sub-atmospheric nasal pressure. The mean inspiratory airflow was used to define three distinct levels of upper airway obstruction, based on a mean inspiratory airflow of 175-225 ml/s, 125-175 ml/s and 75-125 ml/s. While duty cycle responses were similar between genders, women had a greater response in T TOT at all flow limited conditions. (p<0.05). However, the greater response in T TOT led to a more pronounced decline in tidal volume in women compared to men (p<0.05), particularly during the mild and moderate upper airway obstruction. Our data demonstrate that the respiratory rate determines the tidal volume during periods of upper airway obstruction and indicate that individuals with a higher respiratory rate are at risk to develop hypoventilation in face of upper airway obstruction. Because women have a more brisk response in the respiratory rate than men, this may explain the difference in the expression of sleep disordered breathing between genders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3878-3880
Number of pages3
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 V
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventConference Proceedings - 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2004 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 1 2004Sep 5 2004

Keywords

  • Flow limitation
  • Gender
  • Normals
  • Obstruction
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Sleep
  • Upper airway
  • Ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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