Willingness to pay for continued delivery of a lifestyle-based weight loss program: The Hopkins POWER trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective In behavioral studies of weight loss programs, participants typically receive interventions free of charge. Understanding an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for weight loss programs could be helpful when evaluating potential funding models. This study assessed WTP for the continuation of a weight loss program at the end of a weight loss study. Methods WTP was assessed with monthly coaching contacts at the end of the two-year Hopkins POWER trial. Interview-administered questionnaires determined the amount participants were willing to pay for continued intervention. Estimated maximum payment was calculated among those willing to pay and was based on quantile regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, sex, household income, treatment condition, and weight change at 24 months. Results Among the participants (N = 234), 95% were willing to pay for continued weight loss intervention; the adjusted median payment was $45 per month. Blacks had a higher adjusted median WTP ($65/month) compared to Non-Blacks ($45/month), P = 0.021. Conclusions A majority of participants were willing to pay for a continued weight loss intervention with a median monthly amount that was similar to the cost of commercial weight loss programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-285
Number of pages4
JournalObesity
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Weight Reduction Programs
Life Style
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{406cb970c47c4198a282fe67fda95505,
title = "Willingness to pay for continued delivery of a lifestyle-based weight loss program: The Hopkins POWER trial",
abstract = "Objective In behavioral studies of weight loss programs, participants typically receive interventions free of charge. Understanding an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for weight loss programs could be helpful when evaluating potential funding models. This study assessed WTP for the continuation of a weight loss program at the end of a weight loss study. Methods WTP was assessed with monthly coaching contacts at the end of the two-year Hopkins POWER trial. Interview-administered questionnaires determined the amount participants were willing to pay for continued intervention. Estimated maximum payment was calculated among those willing to pay and was based on quantile regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, sex, household income, treatment condition, and weight change at 24 months. Results Among the participants (N = 234), 95{\%} were willing to pay for continued weight loss intervention; the adjusted median payment was $45 per month. Blacks had a higher adjusted median WTP ($65/month) compared to Non-Blacks ($45/month), P = 0.021. Conclusions A majority of participants were willing to pay for a continued weight loss intervention with a median monthly amount that was similar to the cost of commercial weight loss programs.",
author = "Jerome, {Gerald J.} and Reza Alavi and Daumit, {Gail L} and Wang, {Nae Yuh} and Nowella Durkin and Yeh, {Hsin Chieh} and Jeanne Clark and Arlene Dalcin and Janelle Coughlin and Charleston, {Jeanne B} and Thomas Louis and Lawrence Appel",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/oby.20981",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "282--285",
journal = "Obesity",
issn = "1930-7381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Willingness to pay for continued delivery of a lifestyle-based weight loss program

T2 - The Hopkins POWER trial

AU - Jerome, Gerald J.

AU - Alavi, Reza

AU - Daumit, Gail L

AU - Wang, Nae Yuh

AU - Durkin, Nowella

AU - Yeh, Hsin Chieh

AU - Clark, Jeanne

AU - Dalcin, Arlene

AU - Coughlin, Janelle

AU - Charleston, Jeanne B

AU - Louis, Thomas

AU - Appel, Lawrence

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Objective In behavioral studies of weight loss programs, participants typically receive interventions free of charge. Understanding an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for weight loss programs could be helpful when evaluating potential funding models. This study assessed WTP for the continuation of a weight loss program at the end of a weight loss study. Methods WTP was assessed with monthly coaching contacts at the end of the two-year Hopkins POWER trial. Interview-administered questionnaires determined the amount participants were willing to pay for continued intervention. Estimated maximum payment was calculated among those willing to pay and was based on quantile regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, sex, household income, treatment condition, and weight change at 24 months. Results Among the participants (N = 234), 95% were willing to pay for continued weight loss intervention; the adjusted median payment was $45 per month. Blacks had a higher adjusted median WTP ($65/month) compared to Non-Blacks ($45/month), P = 0.021. Conclusions A majority of participants were willing to pay for a continued weight loss intervention with a median monthly amount that was similar to the cost of commercial weight loss programs.

AB - Objective In behavioral studies of weight loss programs, participants typically receive interventions free of charge. Understanding an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for weight loss programs could be helpful when evaluating potential funding models. This study assessed WTP for the continuation of a weight loss program at the end of a weight loss study. Methods WTP was assessed with monthly coaching contacts at the end of the two-year Hopkins POWER trial. Interview-administered questionnaires determined the amount participants were willing to pay for continued intervention. Estimated maximum payment was calculated among those willing to pay and was based on quantile regression adjusted for age, body mass index, race, sex, household income, treatment condition, and weight change at 24 months. Results Among the participants (N = 234), 95% were willing to pay for continued weight loss intervention; the adjusted median payment was $45 per month. Blacks had a higher adjusted median WTP ($65/month) compared to Non-Blacks ($45/month), P = 0.021. Conclusions A majority of participants were willing to pay for a continued weight loss intervention with a median monthly amount that was similar to the cost of commercial weight loss programs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922717469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922717469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/oby.20981

DO - 10.1002/oby.20981

M3 - Article

C2 - 25557807

AN - SCOPUS:84922717469

VL - 23

SP - 282

EP - 285

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 2

ER -