Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease

Leah Kleinman, Emma Mclntosh, Mandy Ryan, Jordana Schmier, Joseph Crawley, G. Richard Locke, Gregory De Lissovoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Over $6 billion per year is spent on prescription medication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study is an economic analysis of patients' willingness to pay for a prescription medication that offers complete relief of GERD symptoms. Methods: The study was a cross-sectional, nonrandomized design recruiting patients from 5 clinical sites. A computer-administered discrete-choice questionnaire was used to explore patients' willingness to pay for various attributes (time to relief, amount of relief, side effects, and out-of-pocket cost) associated with GERD treatment. Patients chose between 2 different combinations of attributes by indicating which scenario they preferred. Data were gathered on health status, health-related quality of life, and sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Two hundred five patients completed the discrete-choice questionnaire with a consistency rate of 99.5%. All attributes were relevant to patient decision making. Respondents were willing to pay up to $182 to obtain complete relief in a short period of time without side effects. Patients with less severe GERD symptoms were willing to pay more to avoid side effects ($58.25 vs $38.43). Older patients were less willing to pay for better relief than younger patients. Conclusions: Results demonstrate that patients are willing to pay more per month for a medication that provides more complete and faster relief from GERD symptoms. This information can guide clinicians and formulary committees in evaluating optimal treatment for GERD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1361-1366
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume162
Issue number12
StatePublished - Jun 24 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Prescriptions
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee
Health Expenditures
Health Status
Decision Making
Economics
Quality of Life
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Kleinman, L., Mclntosh, E., Ryan, M., Schmier, J., Crawley, J., Richard Locke, G., & De Lissovoy, G. (2002). Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Archives of Internal Medicine, 162(12), 1361-1366.

Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease. / Kleinman, Leah; Mclntosh, Emma; Ryan, Mandy; Schmier, Jordana; Crawley, Joseph; Richard Locke, G.; De Lissovoy, Gregory.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 12, 24.06.2002, p. 1361-1366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kleinman, L, Mclntosh, E, Ryan, M, Schmier, J, Crawley, J, Richard Locke, G & De Lissovoy, G 2002, 'Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 162, no. 12, pp. 1361-1366.
Kleinman L, Mclntosh E, Ryan M, Schmier J, Crawley J, Richard Locke G et al. Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2002 Jun 24;162(12):1361-1366.
Kleinman, Leah ; Mclntosh, Emma ; Ryan, Mandy ; Schmier, Jordana ; Crawley, Joseph ; Richard Locke, G. ; De Lissovoy, Gregory. / Willingness to pay for complete symptom relief of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 162, No. 12. pp. 1361-1366.
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