WIC-Based Interventions to Promote Breastfeeding among African-American Women in Baltimore: Effects on Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation

Laura E. Caulfield, Susan M. Gross, Margaret E. Bentley, Yvonne Bronner, Lisa Kessler, Joan Jensen, Benita Weathers, David M. Paige

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluated the single and combined effects of introducing a motivational video and peer counseling into four matched WIC clinics on breastfeeding initiation and continuation at 7-10 days among African-American WIC participants. Of the 242 women with complete data, 48% initiated breastfeeding, but only 31% were still breastfeeding at 7-10 days. Initiation was associated with cesarean delivery, infant feeding instruction, no artificial milk discharge pack, attending the peer counselor only-intervention site, and intention to breastfeed. Continuation was influenced by infant feeding instruction, no artificial milk discharge pack, and intention to breastfeed. Overall, trends toward a positive impact of the breastfeeding promotion activities were evident but weak, and largely gone by 7-10 days postpartum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-22
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Human Lactation
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1998

Keywords

  • African-American
  • Breastfeeding promotion
  • Lactation
  • Peer counselor
  • WIC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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