Why observational studies should be among the tools used in comparative effectiveness research

Nancy A. Dreyer, Sean R. Tunis, Marc Berger, Dan Ollendorf, Pattra Mattox, Richard Gliklich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Doctors, patients, and other decision makers need access to the best available clinical evidence, which can come from systematic reviews, experimental trials, and observational research. Despite methodological challenges, high-quality observational studies have an important role in comparative effectiveness research because they can address issues that are otherwise difficult or impossible to study. In addition, many clinical and policy decisions do not require the very high levels of certainty provided by large, rigorous randomized trials. This paper provides insights and a framework to guide good decision making that involves the full range of high-quality comparative effectiveness research techniques, including observational research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1818-1825
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Why observational studies should be among the tools used in comparative effectiveness research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Dreyer, N. A., Tunis, S. R., Berger, M., Ollendorf, D., Mattox, P., & Gliklich, R. (2010). Why observational studies should be among the tools used in comparative effectiveness research. Health Affairs, 29(10), 1818-1825. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2010.0666