Who’s contributing most to American neuroscience journals: American or foreign authors?

P. Charkhchi, M. Mirbolouk, R. Jalilian, David Mark Yousem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With globalization, the contributions of authors from abroad to the American published literature has increased. We sought to determine the changes with time in the proportional contributions of American and non-American authors in the American neurosciences literature. We hypothesized the following: 1) During the past 21 years, manuscript contributions of American institutions have proportionally decreased in neuroradiology, more than in neurosurgery or neurology; 2) contributions of Asian institutions have affected neuroradiology more than neurosurgery and neurology; and 3) American articles garner more citations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the May issues of 2 of the highest impact American-based neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals published from 1997 to 2017. We counted the number of articles published by nation based on the institution of origin. We looked at trends across time and compared neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals. We also gathered data on the number of citations of each article by nationality. RESULTS: We reviewed 3025 articles. There was a significantly lower ratio of American to non-American authorship in neuroradiology versus neurology/neurosurgery journals (odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.60 – 0.82). There was a significantly decreasing trend in American authorship across the 21 years in neuroradiology. Of the countries outside the United States, Japan contributed most for neuroradiology and neurosurgery journals, and the UK, for neurology. American-authored articles were cited, on average, 1.25 times more frequently than non-American-authored articles. CONCLUSIONS: Non-American contributions have impacted neuroradiology more than other clinical neuroscience fields with Asian authorship showing the greatest impact. That impact is growing, and the causes are manifold. Nonetheless American-authored articles are cited more.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1007
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Neurosurgery
Neurology
Neurosciences
Authorship
Internationality
Manuscripts
Ethnic Groups
Japan
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Who’s contributing most to American neuroscience journals : American or foreign authors? / Charkhchi, P.; Mirbolouk, M.; Jalilian, R.; Yousem, David Mark.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 1001-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7c6f92aafb684a5493609423ec97bc30,
title = "Who’s contributing most to American neuroscience journals: American or foreign authors?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With globalization, the contributions of authors from abroad to the American published literature has increased. We sought to determine the changes with time in the proportional contributions of American and non-American authors in the American neurosciences literature. We hypothesized the following: 1) During the past 21 years, manuscript contributions of American institutions have proportionally decreased in neuroradiology, more than in neurosurgery or neurology; 2) contributions of Asian institutions have affected neuroradiology more than neurosurgery and neurology; and 3) American articles garner more citations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the May issues of 2 of the highest impact American-based neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals published from 1997 to 2017. We counted the number of articles published by nation based on the institution of origin. We looked at trends across time and compared neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals. We also gathered data on the number of citations of each article by nationality. RESULTS: We reviewed 3025 articles. There was a significantly lower ratio of American to non-American authorship in neuroradiology versus neurology/neurosurgery journals (odds ratio 0.70; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.60 – 0.82). There was a significantly decreasing trend in American authorship across the 21 years in neuroradiology. Of the countries outside the United States, Japan contributed most for neuroradiology and neurosurgery journals, and the UK, for neurology. American-authored articles were cited, on average, 1.25 times more frequently than non-American-authored articles. CONCLUSIONS: Non-American contributions have impacted neuroradiology more than other clinical neuroscience fields with Asian authorship showing the greatest impact. That impact is growing, and the causes are manifold. Nonetheless American-authored articles are cited more.",
author = "P. Charkhchi and M. Mirbolouk and R. Jalilian and Yousem, {David Mark}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3174/ajnr.A5624",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "1001--1007",
journal = "American Journal of Neuroradiology",
issn = "0195-6108",
publisher = "American Society of Neuroradiology",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Who’s contributing most to American neuroscience journals

T2 - American or foreign authors?

AU - Charkhchi, P.

AU - Mirbolouk, M.

AU - Jalilian, R.

AU - Yousem, David Mark

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With globalization, the contributions of authors from abroad to the American published literature has increased. We sought to determine the changes with time in the proportional contributions of American and non-American authors in the American neurosciences literature. We hypothesized the following: 1) During the past 21 years, manuscript contributions of American institutions have proportionally decreased in neuroradiology, more than in neurosurgery or neurology; 2) contributions of Asian institutions have affected neuroradiology more than neurosurgery and neurology; and 3) American articles garner more citations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the May issues of 2 of the highest impact American-based neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals published from 1997 to 2017. We counted the number of articles published by nation based on the institution of origin. We looked at trends across time and compared neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals. We also gathered data on the number of citations of each article by nationality. RESULTS: We reviewed 3025 articles. There was a significantly lower ratio of American to non-American authorship in neuroradiology versus neurology/neurosurgery journals (odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.60 – 0.82). There was a significantly decreasing trend in American authorship across the 21 years in neuroradiology. Of the countries outside the United States, Japan contributed most for neuroradiology and neurosurgery journals, and the UK, for neurology. American-authored articles were cited, on average, 1.25 times more frequently than non-American-authored articles. CONCLUSIONS: Non-American contributions have impacted neuroradiology more than other clinical neuroscience fields with Asian authorship showing the greatest impact. That impact is growing, and the causes are manifold. Nonetheless American-authored articles are cited more.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With globalization, the contributions of authors from abroad to the American published literature has increased. We sought to determine the changes with time in the proportional contributions of American and non-American authors in the American neurosciences literature. We hypothesized the following: 1) During the past 21 years, manuscript contributions of American institutions have proportionally decreased in neuroradiology, more than in neurosurgery or neurology; 2) contributions of Asian institutions have affected neuroradiology more than neurosurgery and neurology; and 3) American articles garner more citations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the May issues of 2 of the highest impact American-based neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals published from 1997 to 2017. We counted the number of articles published by nation based on the institution of origin. We looked at trends across time and compared neurology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology journals. We also gathered data on the number of citations of each article by nationality. RESULTS: We reviewed 3025 articles. There was a significantly lower ratio of American to non-American authorship in neuroradiology versus neurology/neurosurgery journals (odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.60 – 0.82). There was a significantly decreasing trend in American authorship across the 21 years in neuroradiology. Of the countries outside the United States, Japan contributed most for neuroradiology and neurosurgery journals, and the UK, for neurology. American-authored articles were cited, on average, 1.25 times more frequently than non-American-authored articles. CONCLUSIONS: Non-American contributions have impacted neuroradiology more than other clinical neuroscience fields with Asian authorship showing the greatest impact. That impact is growing, and the causes are manifold. Nonetheless American-authored articles are cited more.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048686966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048686966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3174/ajnr.A5624

DO - 10.3174/ajnr.A5624

M3 - Article

C2 - 29622559

AN - SCOPUS:85048686966

VL - 39

SP - 1001

EP - 1007

JO - American Journal of Neuroradiology

JF - American Journal of Neuroradiology

SN - 0195-6108

IS - 6

ER -