Who Is Providing the Predominant Care for Older Adults With Dementia?

Mia Yang, Chiang Hua Chang, Donald Carmichael, Esther Oh, Julie P W Bynum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives To identify which clinical specialties are most central for care of people with dementia in the community and long-term care (LTC) settings. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Participants Fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 years with dementia. Measurements Specialty, categorized into primary care (internal or family medicine, geriatrics, or nurse practitioners [NPs]) versus other specialties, of the predominant provider of care (PPC) for each patient, defined by providing the most ambulatory visits. Results Among 2,598,719 beneficiaries with dementia, 74% lived in the community and 80% had a PPC in primary care. In LTC, 91% had primary care as their PPC compared with 77% in the community (P < .001). Cardiology and neurology were the most frequent specialties. NPs were PPCs for 19% of dementia patients in LTC versus 7% in the community (P < .001). Conclusion It is unknown whether specialists are aware of their central role for many dementia patients’ care needs. In LTC, NPs play the lead role as PPCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)802-806
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

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Dementia
Long-Term Care
Nurse Practitioners
Primary Health Care
Patient Care
Fee-for-Service Plans
Neurology
Medicare
Cardiology
Geriatrics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Medicine

Keywords

  • dementia
  • long-term care
  • Medicare
  • Predominant provider
  • primary care
  • specialist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Who Is Providing the Predominant Care for Older Adults With Dementia? / Yang, Mia; Chang, Chiang Hua; Carmichael, Donald; Oh, Esther; Bynum, Julie P W.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 17, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 802-806.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Mia ; Chang, Chiang Hua ; Carmichael, Donald ; Oh, Esther ; Bynum, Julie P W. / Who Is Providing the Predominant Care for Older Adults With Dementia?. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 802-806.
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