White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration: A multicenter clinical trial

K. J. Kao, M. Mickel, H. G. Braine, K. Davis, H. Enright, T. Gernsheimer, M. J. Gillespie, Thomas Stephen Kickler, E. J. Lee, J. J. McCullough, J. G. McFarland, G. J. Nemo, W. D. Noyes, C. A. Schiffer, K. Sell, S. J. Slichter, R. D. Woodson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Most previous studies on white cell (WBC) reduction by filtration have been small-scale studies conducted under tightly controlled laboratory conditions. Their results would be the ideal, rather than what might be expected during routine operation. Study Design and Methods: To obtain information on routine filtration of blood components, data have been collected from a large-scale, ongoing, multicenter clinical trial designed to determine the effectiveness of WBC reduction in or ultraviolet B radiation of platelet concentrates before transfusion in preventing platelet alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness. The WBC content of blood components both before and after filtration was determined by automated cell counters and a manual propidium iodide-staining method, respectively. Platelet and red cell losses during filtration were measured. Results: The average platelet losses after filtration were 24 ± 15 percent and 20 ± 9 percent for apheresis platelets and pooled platelets, respectively. The frequencies at which filtered platelet concentrates contained high levels of residual WBCs (>5 x 106) were 7 percent and 5 percent for apheresis platelets and pooled platelets, respectively. Further analysis of the platelet filtration data showed that greater numbers of total initial WBCs in the pooled platelets were associated with increased percentages of filtration failure (>5 x 106 residual WBCs). For packed red cells, the average losses during filtration were 23 ± 4 percent and 15 ± 3 percent for CPDA-1 units and Adsol units, respectively.The frequencies at which filtered red cells contained >5 x 106 residual WBCs were 2.7 percent for one type of filter and 0.3 percent for another type of filter. Conclusion: There were significant losses of platelets during filtration, which could add to the costs of WBC reduction and lead to possible increases in donor exposures. Filtration failures still occurred, despite careful observation of the standard filtration procedures. The number of total WBCs in pooled platelets before filtration has been identified as an important factor in determining the success of WBC reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalTransfusion
Volume35
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Multicenter Studies
Blood Platelets
Clinical Trials
Blood Component Removal
Platelet Transfusion
Propidium
Observation
Radiation
Staining and Labeling
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Kao, K. J., Mickel, M., Braine, H. G., Davis, K., Enright, H., Gernsheimer, T., ... Woodson, R. D. (1995). White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration: A multicenter clinical trial. Transfusion, 35(1), 13-19.

White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration : A multicenter clinical trial. / Kao, K. J.; Mickel, M.; Braine, H. G.; Davis, K.; Enright, H.; Gernsheimer, T.; Gillespie, M. J.; Kickler, Thomas Stephen; Lee, E. J.; McCullough, J. J.; McFarland, J. G.; Nemo, G. J.; Noyes, W. D.; Schiffer, C. A.; Sell, K.; Slichter, S. J.; Woodson, R. D.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 35, No. 1, 1995, p. 13-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kao, KJ, Mickel, M, Braine, HG, Davis, K, Enright, H, Gernsheimer, T, Gillespie, MJ, Kickler, TS, Lee, EJ, McCullough, JJ, McFarland, JG, Nemo, GJ, Noyes, WD, Schiffer, CA, Sell, K, Slichter, SJ & Woodson, RD 1995, 'White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration: A multicenter clinical trial', Transfusion, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 13-19.
Kao KJ, Mickel M, Braine HG, Davis K, Enright H, Gernsheimer T et al. White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration: A multicenter clinical trial. Transfusion. 1995;35(1):13-19.
Kao, K. J. ; Mickel, M. ; Braine, H. G. ; Davis, K. ; Enright, H. ; Gernsheimer, T. ; Gillespie, M. J. ; Kickler, Thomas Stephen ; Lee, E. J. ; McCullough, J. J. ; McFarland, J. G. ; Nemo, G. J. ; Noyes, W. D. ; Schiffer, C. A. ; Sell, K. ; Slichter, S. J. ; Woodson, R. D. / White cell reduction in platelet concentrates and packed red cells by filtration : A multicenter clinical trial. In: Transfusion. 1995 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 13-19.
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AU - Kao, K. J.

AU - Mickel, M.

AU - Braine, H. G.

AU - Davis, K.

AU - Enright, H.

AU - Gernsheimer, T.

AU - Gillespie, M. J.

AU - Kickler, Thomas Stephen

AU - Lee, E. J.

AU - McCullough, J. J.

AU - McFarland, J. G.

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AU - Noyes, W. D.

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AU - Woodson, R. D.

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