Where children sit in cars: The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation

M. Segui-Gomez, E. Wittenberg, R. Glass, S. Levenson, R. Hingson, J. D. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. This study evaluated the impact of Rhode Island's legislation requiring children younger than 6 years to sit in the rear of motor vehicles. Methods. Roadside observations were conducted in Rhode Island and Massachusetts in 1997 and 1998. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the proportion of vehicles carrying a child in the front seat. Results. Data were collected on 3226 vehicles carrying at least 1 child. In 1998, Rhode Island vehicles were less likely to have a child in the front seat than in 1997 (odds ratio=0.6; 95% confidence interval=0.5, 0.7), whereas no significant changes in child passenger seating behavior occurred in Massachusetts during that period. Conclusions. Rhode Island's legislation seems to have promoted safer child passenger seating behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-313
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume91
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001

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Legislation
Motor Vehicles
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Segui-Gomez, M., Wittenberg, E., Glass, R., Levenson, S., Hingson, R., & Graham, J. D. (2001). Where children sit in cars: The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation. American Journal of Public Health, 91(2), 311-313.

Where children sit in cars : The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation. / Segui-Gomez, M.; Wittenberg, E.; Glass, R.; Levenson, S.; Hingson, R.; Graham, J. D.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 91, No. 2, 2001, p. 311-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Segui-Gomez, M, Wittenberg, E, Glass, R, Levenson, S, Hingson, R & Graham, JD 2001, 'Where children sit in cars: The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 311-313.
Segui-Gomez M, Wittenberg E, Glass R, Levenson S, Hingson R, Graham JD. Where children sit in cars: The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation. American Journal of Public Health. 2001;91(2):311-313.
Segui-Gomez, M. ; Wittenberg, E. ; Glass, R. ; Levenson, S. ; Hingson, R. ; Graham, J. D. / Where children sit in cars : The impact of Rhode Island's new legislation. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2001 ; Vol. 91, No. 2. pp. 311-313.
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