What women think: Cancer causal attributions in a diverse sample of women

Vivian M. Rodríguez, Maria E. Gyure, Rosalie Corona, Joann N Bodurtha, Deborah J. Bowen, John M. Quillin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women hold diverse beliefs about cancer etiology, potentially affecting their use of cancer preventive behaviors. Research has primarily focused on cancer causal attributions survivors and participants from non-diverse backgrounds hold. Less is known about attributions held by women with and without a family history of cancer from a diverse community sample. Participants reported factors they believed cause cancer. Open-ended responses were coded and relations between the top causal attributions and key factors were explored. Findings suggest certain socio-cultural factors play a role in the causal attributions women make about cancer, which can, in turn, inform cancer awareness and prevention messages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-65
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • causal attributions
  • causal beliefs
  • family history
  • heredity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

What women think : Cancer causal attributions in a diverse sample of women. / Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Gyure, Maria E.; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N; Bowen, Deborah J.; Quillin, John M.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 02.01.2015, p. 48-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodríguez, Vivian M. ; Gyure, Maria E. ; Corona, Rosalie ; Bodurtha, Joann N ; Bowen, Deborah J. ; Quillin, John M. / What women think : Cancer causal attributions in a diverse sample of women. In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 48-65.
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