What will it take to eliminate drug-resistant tuberculosis?

Emily Kendall, S. Sahu, M. Pai, G. J. Fox, F. Varaine, H. Cox, J. P. Cegielski, L. Mabote, A. Vassall, David Wesley Dowdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is challenging to diagnose, treat, and prevent, but this situation is slowly changing. If the world is to drastically reduce the incidence of DR-TB, we must stop creating new DR-TB as an essential first step. The DR-TB epidemic that is ongoing should also be directly addressed. First-line drug resistance must be rapidly detected using universal molecular testing for resistance to at least rifampin and, preferably, other key drugs at initial TB diagnosis. DR-TB treatment outcomes must also improve dramatically. Effective use of currently available, new, and repurposed drugs, combined with patient-centered treatment that aids adherence and reduces catastrophic costs, are essential. Innovations within sight, such as short, highly effective, broadly indicated regimens, paired with point-of-care drug susceptibility testing, could accelerate progress in treatment outcomes. Preventing or containing resistance to second-line and novel drugs is also critical and will require high-quality systems for diagnosis, regimen selection, and treatment monitoring. Finally, earlier detection and/or prevention of DR-TB is necessary, with particular attention to airborne infection control, case finding, and preventive therapy for contacts of patients with DR-TB. Implementing these strategies can overcome the barrier that DR-TB represents for global TB elimination efforts, and could ultimately make global elimination of DR-TB (fewer than one annual case per million population worldwide) attainable. There is a strong cost-effectiveness case to support pursuing DR-TB elimination; however, achieving this goal will require substantial global investment plus political and societal commitment at national and local levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-546
Number of pages12
JournalThe international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
Drug Repositioning
Point-of-Care Systems
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Rifampin
Infection Control
Drug Resistance
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Therapeutics
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

What will it take to eliminate drug-resistant tuberculosis? / Kendall, Emily; Sahu, S.; Pai, M.; Fox, G. J.; Varaine, F.; Cox, H.; Cegielski, J. P.; Mabote, L.; Vassall, A.; Dowdy, David Wesley.

In: The international journal of tuberculosis and lung disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 535-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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