What the public thinks about the tobacco industry and its products

M. J. Ashley, Joanna E Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To assess public attitudes toward the tobacco industry and its products, and to identify predictors of attitudes supportive of tobacco industry denormalisation. Design: Population based, cross sectional survey. Setting: Ontario, Canada. Subjects: Adult population (n = 1607). Main outcome measures: Eight different facets of tobacco industry denormalisation were assessed. A denormalisation scale was developed to examine predictors of attitudes supportive of tobacco industry denormalisation, using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Attitudes to the eight facets of tobacco industry denormalisation varied widely. More than half of the respondents supported regulating tobacco as a hazardous product, fining the tobacco industry for earnings from underage smoking, and suing tobacco companies for health care costs caused by tobacco. Majorities also thought that the tobacco industry is dishonest and that cigarettes are too dangerous to be sold at all. Fewer than half of the respondents thought that the tobacco industry is mostly or completely responsible for the health problems smokers have because of smoking and that tobacco companies should be sued for taxes lost from smuggling. In particular, less than a quarter thought that the tobacco industry is most responsible for young people starting to smoke. Non-smoking, knowledge about health effects caused by tobacco, and support for the role of government in health promotion were independent predictors of support for tobacco industry denormalisation. Conclusions: Although Ontarians are ambivalent toward tobacco industry denormalisation, they are supportive of some measures. Mass media programmes aimed at increasing support for tobacco industry denormalisation and continued monitoring of public attitudes toward this strategy are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-400
Number of pages5
JournalTobacco Control
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tobacco Industry
nicotine
industry
Tobacco
smoking
Smoking
Mass Media
Taxes
Health
Ontario
Health Promotion
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Health Care Costs
Population
Canada
smuggling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

What the public thinks about the tobacco industry and its products. / Ashley, M. J.; Cohen, Joanna E.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 12, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 396-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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