What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life? An analysis from the InCHIANTI study

Marla K. Beauchamp, Suzanne G. Leveille, Kushang V. Patel, Dan K. Kiely, Caroline L. Phillips, Stefania Bandinelli, Luigi Ferrucci, Jack Guralnik, Jonathan F. Bean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate and contrast the physical attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m among older adults. Design: Analysis of baseline and 3-yr data from 1026 participants 65 yrs or older in the InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti) study was conducted. Observed and self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline and at 3 yrs were primary outcomes. Predictors included leg speed, leg strength, leg strength symmetry, range of motion, balance, and kyphosis. Results: Balance, leg speed, leg strength, kyphosis, leg strength symmetry, and knee range of motion were associated with self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline (P <0.001, c = 0.85). Balance, leg speed, and knee range of motion were associated with observed 400-m walk (P <0.001, c = 0.85) at baseline. Prospectively, baseline leg speed and leg strength were predictive of both self-reported (P <0.001, c = 0.79) and observed (P <0.001, c = 0.72) ability to walk 400 m at 3 yrs. Conclusions: The profiles of attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed walking ability differ. The factor most consistently associated with current and future walking ability is leg speed. These results draw attention to important foci for rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-404
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume93
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leg
Articular Range of Motion
Kyphosis
Walking
Knee
Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • Mobility Limitation
  • Physical Performance
  • Rehabilitation
  • Successful Aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life? An analysis from the InCHIANTI study. / Beauchamp, Marla K.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Patel, Kushang V.; Kiely, Dan K.; Phillips, Caroline L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack; Bean, Jonathan F.

In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 93, No. 5, 2014, p. 396-404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beauchamp, MK, Leveille, SG, Patel, KV, Kiely, DK, Phillips, CL, Bandinelli, S, Ferrucci, L, Guralnik, J & Bean, JF 2014, 'What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life? An analysis from the InCHIANTI study', American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 93, no. 5, pp. 396-404. https://doi.org/10.1097/PHM.0000000000000034
Beauchamp, Marla K. ; Leveille, Suzanne G. ; Patel, Kushang V. ; Kiely, Dan K. ; Phillips, Caroline L. ; Bandinelli, Stefania ; Ferrucci, Luigi ; Guralnik, Jack ; Bean, Jonathan F. / What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life? An analysis from the InCHIANTI study. In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 93, No. 5. pp. 396-404.
@article{df51d3c12fe64a97b22b543e6713a8d1,
title = "What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life?: An analysis from the InCHIANTI study",
abstract = "Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate and contrast the physical attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m among older adults. Design: Analysis of baseline and 3-yr data from 1026 participants 65 yrs or older in the InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti) study was conducted. Observed and self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline and at 3 yrs were primary outcomes. Predictors included leg speed, leg strength, leg strength symmetry, range of motion, balance, and kyphosis. Results: Balance, leg speed, leg strength, kyphosis, leg strength symmetry, and knee range of motion were associated with self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline (P <0.001, c = 0.85). Balance, leg speed, and knee range of motion were associated with observed 400-m walk (P <0.001, c = 0.85) at baseline. Prospectively, baseline leg speed and leg strength were predictive of both self-reported (P <0.001, c = 0.79) and observed (P <0.001, c = 0.72) ability to walk 400 m at 3 yrs. Conclusions: The profiles of attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed walking ability differ. The factor most consistently associated with current and future walking ability is leg speed. These results draw attention to important foci for rehabilitation.",
keywords = "Mobility Limitation, Physical Performance, Rehabilitation, Successful Aging",
author = "Beauchamp, {Marla K.} and Leveille, {Suzanne G.} and Patel, {Kushang V.} and Kiely, {Dan K.} and Phillips, {Caroline L.} and Stefania Bandinelli and Luigi Ferrucci and Jack Guralnik and Bean, {Jonathan F.}",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1097/PHM.0000000000000034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "93",
pages = "396--404",
journal = "American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0894-9115",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What physical attributes underlie self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m in later life?

T2 - An analysis from the InCHIANTI study

AU - Beauchamp, Marla K.

AU - Leveille, Suzanne G.

AU - Patel, Kushang V.

AU - Kiely, Dan K.

AU - Phillips, Caroline L.

AU - Bandinelli, Stefania

AU - Ferrucci, Luigi

AU - Guralnik, Jack

AU - Bean, Jonathan F.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate and contrast the physical attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m among older adults. Design: Analysis of baseline and 3-yr data from 1026 participants 65 yrs or older in the InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti) study was conducted. Observed and self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline and at 3 yrs were primary outcomes. Predictors included leg speed, leg strength, leg strength symmetry, range of motion, balance, and kyphosis. Results: Balance, leg speed, leg strength, kyphosis, leg strength symmetry, and knee range of motion were associated with self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline (P <0.001, c = 0.85). Balance, leg speed, and knee range of motion were associated with observed 400-m walk (P <0.001, c = 0.85) at baseline. Prospectively, baseline leg speed and leg strength were predictive of both self-reported (P <0.001, c = 0.79) and observed (P <0.001, c = 0.72) ability to walk 400 m at 3 yrs. Conclusions: The profiles of attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed walking ability differ. The factor most consistently associated with current and future walking ability is leg speed. These results draw attention to important foci for rehabilitation.

AB - Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate and contrast the physical attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed ability to walk 400 m among older adults. Design: Analysis of baseline and 3-yr data from 1026 participants 65 yrs or older in the InCHIANTI (Invecchiare in Chianti) study was conducted. Observed and self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline and at 3 yrs were primary outcomes. Predictors included leg speed, leg strength, leg strength symmetry, range of motion, balance, and kyphosis. Results: Balance, leg speed, leg strength, kyphosis, leg strength symmetry, and knee range of motion were associated with self-reported ability to walk 400 m at baseline (P <0.001, c = 0.85). Balance, leg speed, and knee range of motion were associated with observed 400-m walk (P <0.001, c = 0.85) at baseline. Prospectively, baseline leg speed and leg strength were predictive of both self-reported (P <0.001, c = 0.79) and observed (P <0.001, c = 0.72) ability to walk 400 m at 3 yrs. Conclusions: The profiles of attributes that are associated with self-reported vs. observed walking ability differ. The factor most consistently associated with current and future walking ability is leg speed. These results draw attention to important foci for rehabilitation.

KW - Mobility Limitation

KW - Physical Performance

KW - Rehabilitation

KW - Successful Aging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899649960&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899649960&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000034

DO - 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000034

M3 - Article

C2 - 24322434

AN - SCOPUS:84899649960

VL - 93

SP - 396

EP - 404

JO - American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0894-9115

IS - 5

ER -