What is the Evidence that Increasing Engagement of Individuals in Self-Management Improves the Processes and Outcomes of Care?

Debra L. Roter, Ann Louise Kinmonth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that collaborative decision making between patient and practitioner can lead to a more active and engaged patient in the treatment process with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills, well-being and clinical risk. There is trial evidence to support self-management approaches at the individual, group and social levels. However no studies have yet demonstrated effects on diabetes disease endpoints, and economic analyses are absent or weak. Moreover, mechanisms of action remain poorly understood and further research is still needed in those areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Evidence Base for Diabetes Care
Subtitle of host publicationSecond Edition
PublisherJohn Wiley and Sons
Pages419-437
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9780470032749
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 12 2010

Keywords

  • Communication
  • Group education
  • Internet education
  • Patient activation
  • Patient empowerment
  • Patient engagement
  • Patient participation
  • Patient-practitioner relationships
  • Peer support
  • Self-management
  • Social support
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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