What has been achieved in HIV prevention, treatment and care for people who inject drugs, 2010-2012? A review of the six highest burden countries

Louisa Degenhardt, Bradley M. Mathers, Andrea L. Wirtz, Daniel Wolfe, Adeeba Kamarulzaman, M. Patrizia Carrieri, Steffanie A. Strathdee, Kasia Malinowska-Sempruch, Michel Kazatchkine, Chris Beyrer

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

Abstract

Objective: In 2010 the international HIV/AIDS community called on countries to take action to prevent HIV transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID). To set a baseline we proposed an "accountability matrix", focusing upon six countries accounting for half of the global population of PWID: China, Malaysia, Russia, Ukraine, Vietnam and the USA. Two years on, we review progress. Design: We searched peer-reviewed literature, conducted online searches, and contacted experts for 'grey' literature. We limited searches to documents published since December 2009 and used decision rules endorsed in earlier reviews. Results: Policy shifts are increasing coverage of key interventions for PWID in China, Malaysia, Vietnam and Ukraine. Increases in PWID receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) and opioid substitution treatment (OST) in both Vietnam and China, and a shift in Malaysia from a punitive law enforcement approach to evidence-based treatment are promising developments. The USA and Russia have had no advances on PWID access to needle and syringe programmes (NSP), OST or ART. There have also been policy setbacks in these countries, with Russia reaffirming its stance against OST and closing down access to information on methadone, and the USA reinstituting its Congressional ban on Federal funding for NSPs. Conclusions: Prevention of HIV infection and access to HIV treatment for PWID is possible. Whether countries with concentrated epidemics among PWID will meet goals of achieving universal access and eliminating new HIV infections remains unknown. As long as law enforcement responses counter public health responses, health-seeking behaviour and health service delivery will be limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Injecting drug use, HIV, Needle and syringe programme
  • Opioid substitution therapy, Antiretroviral therapy, Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

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