What Happened to the Complication? The Importance of ACS NSQIP Pediatric in Optimizing Quality Improvement Initiatives for Resident Education

Bennett W. Calder, Joseph Sakran, Christian J. Streck, Robert A. Cina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conference is considered the golden hour of surgical education. Most training programs lack standardized methods to evaluate self-reported outcomes and contributions to resident education. The purpose of this study was to determine whether residents underreport pediatric postoperative complications thereby limiting a comprehensive educational opportunity and the ability to adequately perform quality improvement during M&M conference. Design A retrospective analysis of resident reports submitted to the M&M committee at an academic medical center was conducted over 1 year. All complications were compared to the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data abstracted over the same period. A descriptive analysis of perioperative events was performed. Setting This study was conducted at the Medical University of South Carolina Medical Center and MUSC Children's Hospital, an academic tertiary care center located in Charleston, South Carolina. Results Overall, 81 complications were captured. Resident and NSQIP databases captured 27 (33%) and 68 (84%) complications, respectively. Residents were more likely to report major complications. More common sources of postoperative morbidity, including surgical site infection and transfusion, were underreported at 20% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Resident reporting inadequately captures the full complement of pediatric perioperative complications. NSQIP-abstracted data serve as a useful adjunct to traditional M&M reporting in capturing complications underreported by trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-436
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • education
  • NSQIP
  • pediatric
  • pediatric surgery fellows
  • quality
  • resident
  • surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

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