What Evidence is Available on End-of-life (EOL) Care and Latino Elders? A Literature Review

Dulce Cruz-Oliver, Melissa Talamantes, Sandra Sanchez-Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Low-income and minority persons, such as Latinos, encounter substantial barriers in accessing effective end-of-life (EOL) care. This study intends to review current evidence on how to deliver EOL care to Latino elders. Methods: Literature search in PubMed and Ovid Web sites of articles indexed in Medline (1948-2011), Cochrane (2005-2011), Embase, and PsychInfo (1967-2011) databases. Articles were included if they contained (1) study participants' race/ethnicity, (2) adults or population older than 60 years, and (3) information related to EOL care. Results: A total of 64 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles met the inclusion criteria. After reviewing the quality of evidence, 4 themes were identified and summarized: EOL preferences, hospice, Latino culture, and caregiving. Conclusion: Latino elders have traditional acculturation practices, face EOL decisions with family support, and, if educated, are receptive toward hospice and caregiver support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-97
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Terminal Care
Hispanic Americans
Hospices
Acculturation
PubMed
Caregivers
Databases
Population

Keywords

  • elder
  • end of life
  • Hispanic
  • hospice
  • Latino
  • palliative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What Evidence is Available on End-of-life (EOL) Care and Latino Elders? A Literature Review. / Cruz-Oliver, Dulce; Talamantes, Melissa; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra.

In: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 87-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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