What do we need to do to cure HIV infection.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Finding a cure for HIV infection requires methods to stop ongoing viral replication, to identify all reservoirs in which nonreplicating HIV persists, and to eliminate each of these reservoirs. Current antiretroviral therapy largely stops ongoing viral replication. This is a reflection of the extremely high antiviral activity of some classes of antiretroviral drugs as revealed in a novel index, the inhibitory potential, which incorporates the slope parameter of the dose-response curve. This index may aid in the rational selection of fully suppressive therapy. At least 2 stable reservoirs of latently infected cells have been identified, and attempts are under way to identify compounds that selectively reactivate latent HIV and allow elimination of these reservoirs. This article summarizes a presentation made by Robert F. Siliciano, MD, PhD, at the International AIDS Society-USA continuing medical education program held in Atlanta in March 2010.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-108
Number of pages5
JournalTopics in HIV medicine : a publication of the International AIDS Society, USA
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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HIV Infections
HIV
Continuing Medical Education
Antiviral Agents
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

What do we need to do to cure HIV infection. / Siliciano, Robert F.

In: Topics in HIV medicine : a publication of the International AIDS Society, USA, Vol. 18, No. 3, 08.2010, p. 104-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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