What do hospitalists think about inpatient mammography for hospitalized women who are overdue for their breast cancer screening?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A recent study showed that many hospitalized women are nonadherent with breast cancer screening recommendations, and that a majority of these women would be amenable to inpatient screening if it were offered. OBJECTIVE: Explore hospitalists' views about the appropriateness of inpatient breast cancer screening and their concerns about related matters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4 hospitalist groups affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medical Institution. χ2 and t-test statistics were used to identify hospitalist characteristics that were associated with being supportive of inpatient screening mammography. RESULTS: The response rate was 92%. Sixty-two percent of respondents believed that hospitalists should not be involved in breast cancer screening. In response to clinical scenarios describing hospitalized women who were overdue for screening, only one-third of hospitalists said that they would order a screening mammogram. Lack of follow-up on screening mammography results was cited as the most common concern related to ordering the test. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility and potential barriers associated with inpatient screening mammography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-245
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Hospitalists
Mammography
Early Detection of Cancer
Inpatients
Breast Neoplasms
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Assessment and Diagnosis
  • Care Planning
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Leadership and Management
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "What do hospitalists think about inpatient mammography for hospitalized women who are overdue for their breast cancer screening?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A recent study showed that many hospitalized women are nonadherent with breast cancer screening recommendations, and that a majority of these women would be amenable to inpatient screening if it were offered. OBJECTIVE: Explore hospitalists' views about the appropriateness of inpatient breast cancer screening and their concerns about related matters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4 hospitalist groups affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medical Institution. χ2 and t-test statistics were used to identify hospitalist characteristics that were associated with being supportive of inpatient screening mammography. RESULTS: The response rate was 92{\%}. Sixty-two percent of respondents believed that hospitalists should not be involved in breast cancer screening. In response to clinical scenarios describing hospitalized women who were overdue for screening, only one-third of hospitalists said that they would order a screening mammogram. Lack of follow-up on screening mammography results was cited as the most common concern related to ordering the test. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility and potential barriers associated with inpatient screening mammography.",
author = "Waseem Khaliq and Howell, {Eric E} and Scott Wright",
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T1 - What do hospitalists think about inpatient mammography for hospitalized women who are overdue for their breast cancer screening?

AU - Khaliq, Waseem

AU - Howell, Eric E

AU - Wright, Scott

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N2 - BACKGROUND: A recent study showed that many hospitalized women are nonadherent with breast cancer screening recommendations, and that a majority of these women would be amenable to inpatient screening if it were offered. OBJECTIVE: Explore hospitalists' views about the appropriateness of inpatient breast cancer screening and their concerns about related matters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4 hospitalist groups affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medical Institution. χ2 and t-test statistics were used to identify hospitalist characteristics that were associated with being supportive of inpatient screening mammography. RESULTS: The response rate was 92%. Sixty-two percent of respondents believed that hospitalists should not be involved in breast cancer screening. In response to clinical scenarios describing hospitalized women who were overdue for screening, only one-third of hospitalists said that they would order a screening mammogram. Lack of follow-up on screening mammography results was cited as the most common concern related to ordering the test. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility and potential barriers associated with inpatient screening mammography.

AB - BACKGROUND: A recent study showed that many hospitalized women are nonadherent with breast cancer screening recommendations, and that a majority of these women would be amenable to inpatient screening if it were offered. OBJECTIVE: Explore hospitalists' views about the appropriateness of inpatient breast cancer screening and their concerns about related matters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 4 hospitalist groups affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medical Institution. χ2 and t-test statistics were used to identify hospitalist characteristics that were associated with being supportive of inpatient screening mammography. RESULTS: The response rate was 92%. Sixty-two percent of respondents believed that hospitalists should not be involved in breast cancer screening. In response to clinical scenarios describing hospitalized women who were overdue for screening, only one-third of hospitalists said that they would order a screening mammogram. Lack of follow-up on screening mammography results was cited as the most common concern related to ordering the test. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility and potential barriers associated with inpatient screening mammography.

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