Weight Status, Self-Competence, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Children

Jyu Lin Chen, Chao Hsing Yeh, Christine Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate Chinese children's perceptions of self-competence and the coping strategies based on gender and weight status using the Terror Management Theory. A total of 331 Chinese children completed body mass index (BMI), Self-Perception Profile for Children, and Schoolagers' Coping Strategies Inventory. Mothers completed demographic information and the Family Assessment Device. Results indicated that better behavioral conduct competence contributed to better global self-worth in boys; in girls, better behavioral conduct competence and physical appearance competence contributed to better global self-worth. Higher BMI was related to lower athletic competency in boys and lower social competence in girls. Eating and drinking were reported as one of the most frequently used coping strategies by children, but the children felt that this strategy was not effective. Results of this study suggest that culture plays an important role in children's perceived self-competence and coping strategies. Health care providers and educators should incorporate assessment of self-competence and coping strategies into patient care and education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-185
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Competency
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Health Educators
Equipment and Supplies
Patient Education
Self Concept
Health Personnel
Drinking
Sports
Patient Care
Eating
Mothers
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Weight Status, Self-Competence, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Children. / Chen, Jyu Lin; Yeh, Chao Hsing; Kennedy, Christine.

In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 22, No. 3, 06.2007, p. 176-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Jyu Lin ; Yeh, Chao Hsing ; Kennedy, Christine. / Weight Status, Self-Competence, and Coping Strategies in Chinese Children. In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 176-185.
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