Weight loss strategies associated with BMI in overweight adults with type 2 diabetes at entry into the look ahead (action for health in diabetes) trial

Hollie A. Raynor, Robert W. Jeffery, Andrea M. Ruggiero, Jeanne Clark, Linda M. Delahanty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Intentional weight loss is recommended for those with type 2 diabetes, but the strategies patients attempt and their effectiveness for weight management are unknown. In this investigation we describe intentional weight loss strategies used and those related to BMI in a diverse sample of overweight participants with type 2 diabetes at enrollment in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) clinical trial RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -This was a cross-sectional study of baseline weight loss strategies, including self-weighing frequency, eating patterns, and weight control practices, reported in 3,063 women and 2,082 men aged 45-74 years with BMI ≥;25 kg/m 2. RESULTS - Less than half (41.4%) of participants self-weighed ≥1/week. Participants ate breakfast 6.0 ± 1.8 days/week, ate 5.0 ± 3.1 meals/snacks per day, and ate 1.9 ± 2.7 fast food meals/week. The three most common weight control practices (increasing fruits and vegetables, cutting out sweets, and eating less high-carbohydrate foods) were reported by ̃60% of participants for ≥20 weeks over the previous year. Adjusted models showed that self-weighing less than once per week (B = 0.83), more fast food meals consumed per week (B = 0.14), and fewer breakfast meals consumed per week (B = -0.19) were associated (P <0.05) with a higher BMI (R 2 = 0.24).CONCLUSIONS - Regular self-weighing and breakfast consumption, along with infrequent consumption of fast food, were related to lower BMI in the Look AHEAD study population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1299-1304
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Fast Foods
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Breakfast
Meals
Weight Loss
Health
Weights and Measures
Eating
Snacks
Vegetables
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Carbohydrates
Clinical Trials
Food
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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Weight loss strategies associated with BMI in overweight adults with type 2 diabetes at entry into the look ahead (action for health in diabetes) trial. / Raynor, Hollie A.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Ruggiero, Andrea M.; Clark, Jeanne; Delahanty, Linda M.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 31, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 1299-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raynor, Hollie A. ; Jeffery, Robert W. ; Ruggiero, Andrea M. ; Clark, Jeanne ; Delahanty, Linda M. / Weight loss strategies associated with BMI in overweight adults with type 2 diabetes at entry into the look ahead (action for health in diabetes) trial. In: Diabetes Care. 2008 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 1299-1304.
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