Weight loss is not associated hyperleptinemia in humans pancreatic cancer

Daniel R. Brown, Dan E Berkowitz, Michael J. Breslow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pathological weight loss is a feature of many diseases and contributes to mortality and morbidity. Although cytokines have been implicated in some models of pathological weight loss, little is known about cellular mechanisms responsible for cachexia in patients with cancer. Leptin is a fat cell product that acts centrally to reduce appetite and decrease metabolism. Leptin synthesis is stimulated by cytokines, and circulating levels of cytokines are elevated in some cancer patients. We hypothesized that cytokine-induced hyperleptinemia contributes to pathological weight loss in patients with pancreatic cancer. To evaluate this hypothesis, fasting serum leptin concentrations were measured in 64 patients undergoing surgery for pancreatic cancer. Preoperative interviews were used to assess body weight and appetite history. Thirty of 64 pancreatic cancer patients had cachexia (weight loss of > 10% over the 6 months before surgery). Self-reported loss of appetite was associated with the presence of cachexia. Leptin concentrations, when corrected for body mass index, were lower than levels reported in healthy humans. Six patients had leptin levels more than 2 times those predicted by body mass index. There was no association between patients with increased leptin concentration and weight loss or anorexia. We conclude that a reduced appetite contributes to weight loss in patients with pancreatic cancer. High plasma leptin levels, however, do not appear to contribute to cachexia in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Leptin
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Weight Loss
Cachexia
Appetite
Cytokines
Surgery
Body Mass Index
Metabolism
Anorexia
Adipocytes
History
Fats
Association reactions
Plasmas
Fasting
Neoplasms
Body Weight
Interviews
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Weight loss is not associated hyperleptinemia in humans pancreatic cancer. / Brown, Daniel R.; Berkowitz, Dan E; Breslow, Michael J.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 86, No. 1, 2001, p. 162-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Daniel R. ; Berkowitz, Dan E ; Breslow, Michael J. / Weight loss is not associated hyperleptinemia in humans pancreatic cancer. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2001 ; Vol. 86, No. 1. pp. 162-166.
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