Weight loss in mildly to moderately obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Philip L Smith, A. R. Gold, D. A. Meyers, E. F. Haponik, E. R. Bleecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The therapeutic effects of weight loss were evaluated in 15 hypersomnolent patients with moderately severe obstructive sleep apnea. As patients decreased their body weight from 106.2 ± 7.3 kg (mean ± SE) to 96.6 ± 5.9 kg, apnea frequency fell from 55.0 ± 7.5 to 29.2 ± 7.1 episodes/h (p <0.01) in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep with an associated significant decline in the mean oxyhemoglobin saturation during the remaining episodes of sleep apnea from 11.9 ± 2.4% to 7.9 ± 1.9% (p <0.02). Sleep patterns also improved, with a reduction in stage I sleep from 40.2 ± 7.3% to 23.5 ± 4.8% (p <0.01), and a rise in stage II sleep from 37.3 ± 7.0% to 49.4 ± 4.6% (p <0.03). In the 9 patients with the most marked fall in apnea frequency, the tendency toward daytime hypersomnolence was decreased (p <0.05). No significant changes in sleep patterns occurred in 8 age- and weight-matched control patients who did not lose weight. Moderate weight loss alone can alleviate sleep apnea, improve sleep architecture, and decrease daytime hypersomnolence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-855
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume103
Issue number6 I
StatePublished - 1985

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Weight Loss
Sleep
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence
Sleep Stages
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Apnea
Weights and Measures
Oxyhemoglobins
Therapeutic Uses
Eye Movements
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Smith, P. L., Gold, A. R., Meyers, D. A., Haponik, E. F., & Bleecker, E. R. (1985). Weight loss in mildly to moderately obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Annals of Internal Medicine, 103(6 I), 850-855.

Weight loss in mildly to moderately obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea. / Smith, Philip L; Gold, A. R.; Meyers, D. A.; Haponik, E. F.; Bleecker, E. R.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 103, No. 6 I, 1985, p. 850-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, PL, Gold, AR, Meyers, DA, Haponik, EF & Bleecker, ER 1985, 'Weight loss in mildly to moderately obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea', Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 103, no. 6 I, pp. 850-855.
Smith, Philip L ; Gold, A. R. ; Meyers, D. A. ; Haponik, E. F. ; Bleecker, E. R. / Weight loss in mildly to moderately obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1985 ; Vol. 103, No. 6 I. pp. 850-855.
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