Weight history and subclinical myocardial damage

Chiadi Ericson Ndumele, Laura Cobb, Mariana Lazo-Elizondo, Natalie A. Bello, Amil Shah, Vijay Nambi, Roger S Blumenthal, Gary Gerstenblith, Scott D. Solomon, Christie M. Ballantyne, Elizabeth Selvin, Josef Coresh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Excess weight is associated with subclinical myocardial damage, as reflected by high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentrations, which portends high heart failure risk. However, the association between weight history and myocardial damage is unknown. METHODS: We evaluated 9062 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) visit 4 (1996 -1999) participants with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 kg/m2 and no previous cardiovascular disease. We cross-tabulated visit 4 ("current") BMI categories of normal weight, overweight, and obese with those at visit 1 (1987-1989) and with BMI categories calculated from self-reported weight at age 25 years. Duration of obesity was calculated in years. A cumulative weight measure of "excess BMI-years" was also calculated [product of mean BMI (centered at 25 kg/m2) over all ARIC time points X follow-up duration]. We used logistic regression to estimate associations of weight history metrics with increased hs-cTnT (≥14 ng/L) at visit 4. RESULTS: Overall, 623 individuals (7%) had increased hs-cTnT at visit 4. Within each current BMI category, previous excess weight was associated with increased hscTnT, with the strongest associations for those with past and current obesity [odds ratio (OR), 3.85; 95% CI, 2.51-5.90 for obesity at age 25 years and visit 4]. Each 10-year longer obesity duration was associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.17-1.35). Each 100 higher excess BMI-years was also progressively associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14 -1.27). CONCLUSIONS: Previous obesity and greater cumulative weight from young adulthood increase the likelihood of myocardial damage, indicating long-term toxic effects of adiposity on the myocardium and the need for weight maintenance strategies targeting the entire life span.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Troponin T
History
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Poisons
Atherosclerosis
Logistics
Adiposity
Myocardium
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Logistic Models
Maintenance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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Weight history and subclinical myocardial damage. / Ndumele, Chiadi Ericson; Cobb, Laura; Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana; Bello, Natalie A.; Shah, Amil; Nambi, Vijay; Blumenthal, Roger S; Gerstenblith, Gary; Solomon, Scott D.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef.

In: Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 201-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ndumele, Chiadi Ericson ; Cobb, Laura ; Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana ; Bello, Natalie A. ; Shah, Amil ; Nambi, Vijay ; Blumenthal, Roger S ; Gerstenblith, Gary ; Solomon, Scott D. ; Ballantyne, Christie M. ; Selvin, Elizabeth ; Coresh, Josef. / Weight history and subclinical myocardial damage. In: Clinical Chemistry. 2018 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 201-209.
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AU - Ndumele, Chiadi Ericson

AU - Cobb, Laura

AU - Lazo-Elizondo, Mariana

AU - Bello, Natalie A.

AU - Shah, Amil

AU - Nambi, Vijay

AU - Blumenthal, Roger S

AU - Gerstenblith, Gary

AU - Solomon, Scott D.

AU - Ballantyne, Christie M.

AU - Selvin, Elizabeth

AU - Coresh, Josef

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Excess weight is associated with subclinical myocardial damage, as reflected by high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) concentrations, which portends high heart failure risk. However, the association between weight history and myocardial damage is unknown. METHODS: We evaluated 9062 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) visit 4 (1996 -1999) participants with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 kg/m2 and no previous cardiovascular disease. We cross-tabulated visit 4 ("current") BMI categories of normal weight, overweight, and obese with those at visit 1 (1987-1989) and with BMI categories calculated from self-reported weight at age 25 years. Duration of obesity was calculated in years. A cumulative weight measure of "excess BMI-years" was also calculated [product of mean BMI (centered at 25 kg/m2) over all ARIC time points X follow-up duration]. We used logistic regression to estimate associations of weight history metrics with increased hs-cTnT (≥14 ng/L) at visit 4. RESULTS: Overall, 623 individuals (7%) had increased hs-cTnT at visit 4. Within each current BMI category, previous excess weight was associated with increased hscTnT, with the strongest associations for those with past and current obesity [odds ratio (OR), 3.85; 95% CI, 2.51-5.90 for obesity at age 25 years and visit 4]. Each 10-year longer obesity duration was associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.17-1.35). Each 100 higher excess BMI-years was also progressively associated with increased hs-cTnT (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14 -1.27). CONCLUSIONS: Previous obesity and greater cumulative weight from young adulthood increase the likelihood of myocardial damage, indicating long-term toxic effects of adiposity on the myocardium and the need for weight maintenance strategies targeting the entire life span.

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