Weight Gain as a Function of Smoking Cessation and 2-Mg Nicotine Gum Use Among Middle-Aged Smokers With Mild Lung Impairment in the First 2 Years of the Lung Health Study

Mitchell Nides, Cynthia Rand, Jeff Dolce, Robert Murray, Peggy O'Hara, Helen Voelker, John Connett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The extent and predictors of weight change were assessed among sustained nonsmoking special intervention participants in the Lung Health Study. The intervention included a 12-session group program and 2-mg nicotine gum. At 12 months, female sustained quitters (SQs; n = 248) had gained a mean of 8.4% (5.3 kg) of their baseline weight, whereas male SQs (n = 443) had gained 6.7% (5.5 kg). By 24 months, female SQs had gained 9.8% of their baseline weight compared with 6.9% for men. Nicotine gum usage delayed a portion of the weight gain. Multiple regression analysis showed that weight gain at 12 months was associated with a higher baseline salivary cotinine level, a lower baseline body mass index, drinking less alcohol per week, and a lower cotinine level at 12 months (indicating less or no nicotine gum use). We conclude that moderate weight gain is a long-term consequence of smoking cessation-a portion of which can be delayed with 2-mg nicotine gum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-361
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1994

Keywords

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • cigarette smoking
  • nicotine gum
  • smoking cessation
  • weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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