Web-based data collection: an effective strategy for increasing African Americans' participation in health-related research.

Pamela E. Scott-Johnson, Susan M Gross, Dorothy C. Browne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study sought to explore response modes (via web-based vs paper surveys) and rates to a follow-up health questionnaire and to examine respondent characteristics by response modes. 192 young adult African Americans responded online or by paper. We found observable differences in follow-up responses, with more participants completing the online version first. No statistical differences were revealed in response modes based on academic discipline, sex, income or health status. The 60% followup response rate supports web-based data collection as a viable means of assessing health information from African Americans. This research provides evidence of the Internet as a viable alternative for increasing participation of young African American adults, a relatively understudied group, to obtain data on health status and behaviors, over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume20
Issue number1 Suppl 1
StatePublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Health Status
Health
Research
Internet
Young Adult
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Web-based data collection : an effective strategy for increasing African Americans' participation in health-related research. / Scott-Johnson, Pamela E.; Gross, Susan M; Browne, Dorothy C.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 20, No. 1 Suppl 1, 12.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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