Wealth and its associations with enteric parasitic infections in a low-income community in Peru: Use of principal component analysis

Shantanu Nundy, Robert H. Gilman, Lihua Xiao, Lilia Cabrera, Rosa Cama, Ynes R. Ortega, Geoffrey Kahn, Vitaliano A. Cama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The association of wealth and infections with Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, and microsporidia were examined in a longitudinal cohort conducted in Peru from 2001 to 2006. Data from 492 participants were daily clinical manifestations, weekly copro-parasitological diagnosis, and housing characteristics and assets owned (48 variables), and these data were used to construct a global wealth index using principal component analysis. Data were analyzed using continuous and categorical (wealth tertiles) models. Participant's mean age was 3.43 years (range = 0-12 years), with average follow-up of 993 days. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified significant associations between wealth and infections with Giardia and microsporidia. Participants with greater wealth indexes were associated with protection against Giardia (P < 0.001) and persistent Giardia infections (> 14 days). For microsporidia, greater wealth was protective (P = 0.066 continuous and P = 0.042 by tertiles). Contrarily, infections with Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora were independent of wealth. Thus, subtle differences in wealth may affect the frequency of specific parasitic infections within low-income communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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