Vitamin D status, functional decline, and mortality in peripheral artery disease

Mary M. McDermott, Kiang Liu, Luigi Ferrucci, Lu Tian, Jack Guralnik, Peter Kopp, Linda Van Horn, Yihua Liao, David Green, Melina Kibbe, Robert Sufit, Lihui Zhao, Michael H. Criqui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Associations of vitamin D levels with prospectively measured functional decline and mortality in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) are unknown. We determined whether lower baseline vitamin D levels are associated with a faster decline in functional performance and higher mortality among people with and without PAD. A total of 658 participants (395 with PAD) underwent baseline measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (DiaSorin radioimmunoassay), a 6-minute walk test, 4-meter walking velocity and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and were followed annually for up to 4 years. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index, comorbidities, the ankle-brachial index, and other confounders. Among participants with PAD, lower baseline vitamin D levels were associated with a faster decline in the 6-minute walk (vitamin D <30 nmol/L: -70.0 feet/year; vitamin D 30 to <50 nmol/L: -72.3 feet/year; vitamin D 50 to <75 nmol/L: -35.5 feet/year; vitamin D 75 to <120 nmol/L: -35.9 feet/year; p trend=0.012). PAD participants with vitamin D <30 nmol/L had a faster decline in the SPPB and 6-minute walk compared to those with levels of 50 to <75 (p=0.034 and p=0.04, respectively). Among participants without PAD, lower vitamin D was associated with a faster decline in the fast 4-meter walking velocity (p trend=0.003). There were no significant associations of baseline vitamin D levels with all-cause or cardiovascular disease mortality in PAD or non-PAD participants. In conclusion, among individuals with and without PAD, low vitamin D status was associated with a faster decline in some measures of functional performance but was not related to mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-26
Number of pages9
JournalVascular Medicine
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • exercise
  • intermittent claudication
  • peripheral arterial disease
  • peripheral vascular diseases
  • walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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