Vitamin D in clinically isolated syndrome

Evidence for possible neuroprotection

Ellen Mahar Mowry, D. Pelletier, Z. Gao, M. D. Howell, S. S. Zamvil, E. Waubant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and purpose: Vitamin D status has been associated with inflammatory activity in multiple sclerosis (MS), but it is not known if it is associated with gray matter volume, the loss of which predicts long-term disability in MS. The association of vitamin D levels with brain volume measures and inflammatory activity in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) was investigated. Methods: In the phase 2 CIS trial of atorvastatin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were evaluated for their age-adjusted associations with normalized gray matter and brain parenchymal volumes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and clinical and MRI measures of inflammatory activity were also assessed. Results: In 65 patients in this substudy, each 25 nmol/l higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was associated with 7.8 ml higher gray matter volume (95% confidence interval 1.0, 14.6, P = 0.025). There was a tendency for an inverse association of average 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and the composite end-point of ≥3 new brain T2 lesions or ≥1 relapse within a year (odds ratio per 25 nmol/l higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D level 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.41, 1.08, P = 0.096). Conclusions: Vitamin D status may impact neurodegeneration after CIS, although these results should be replicated in a second study. If confirmed in clinical trials, vitamin D supplementation may reduce long-term disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-332
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Vitamin D
Brain
Multiple Sclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Neuroprotection
Clinical Trials
Recurrence
Gray Matter

Keywords

  • Demyelinating disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neurodegenerative disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Vitamin D in clinically isolated syndrome : Evidence for possible neuroprotection. / Mowry, Ellen Mahar; Pelletier, D.; Gao, Z.; Howell, M. D.; Zamvil, S. S.; Waubant, E.

In: European Journal of Neurology, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 327-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mowry, EM, Pelletier, D, Gao, Z, Howell, MD, Zamvil, SS & Waubant, E 2016, 'Vitamin D in clinically isolated syndrome: Evidence for possible neuroprotection', European Journal of Neurology, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 327-332. https://doi.org/10.1111/ene.12844
Mowry, Ellen Mahar ; Pelletier, D. ; Gao, Z. ; Howell, M. D. ; Zamvil, S. S. ; Waubant, E. / Vitamin D in clinically isolated syndrome : Evidence for possible neuroprotection. In: European Journal of Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 327-332.
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