Vitamin and carotenoid status in older women: Associations with the frailty syndrome

Elisabete Michelon, Caroline Blaum, Richard David Semba, Qian Li Xue, Michelle O. Ricks, Linda P Fried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. We investigated the relationship of micronutrient deficiencies with the frailty syndrome in older women living in the community. Methods. Frailty status and serum micronutrients were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 754 women, 70-80 years old, from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II. Results. Among nonfrail, prefrail, and frail women, respectively, geometric mean serum concentrations were 1.842, 1.593, and 1.376 μmol/L for total carotenoids (p <.001); 2.66, 2.51, and 2.43 μmol/L for retinol (p = .04); 50.9, 47.4, and 43.8 nmol/L for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p = .019); 43.0, 35.8, and 30.9 nmol/L for vitamin B6 (p = .002); and 10.2, 9.3, and 8.7 ng/mL for folate (p = .03). Frail women were more likely to have at least two or more micronutrient deficiencies (p = .05). The age-adjusted odds ratios of being frail were significantly higher for those participants whose micronutrient concentrations were in the lowest quartile compared to the top three quartiles for total carotenoids, α-tocopherol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin B6. The association between nutrients and frailty was strongest for β-carotene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and total carotenoids (odds ratio ranging from 1.82 to 2.45, p = .05), after adjusting for age, sociodemographic status, smoking status, and body mass index. Conclusion. Frail women are more likely to have relatively low serum carotenoid and micronutrient concentrations and are more likely to have multiple micronutrient deficiencies. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine the relationships between micronutrient concentrations and frailty in older women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)600-607
Number of pages8
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume61
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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Micronutrients
Carotenoids
Vitamins
Vitamin B 6
Serum
Odds Ratio
Lutein
Tocopherols
Women's Health
Vitamin A
Folic Acid
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

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Vitamin and carotenoid status in older women : Associations with the frailty syndrome. / Michelon, Elisabete; Blaum, Caroline; Semba, Richard David; Xue, Qian Li; Ricks, Michelle O.; Fried, Linda P.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 61, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 600-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective. We investigated the relationship of micronutrient deficiencies with the frailty syndrome in older women living in the community. Methods. Frailty status and serum micronutrients were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 754 women, 70-80 years old, from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II. Results. Among nonfrail, prefrail, and frail women, respectively, geometric mean serum concentrations were 1.842, 1.593, and 1.376 μmol/L for total carotenoids (p <.001); 2.66, 2.51, and 2.43 μmol/L for retinol (p = .04); 50.9, 47.4, and 43.8 nmol/L for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p = .019); 43.0, 35.8, and 30.9 nmol/L for vitamin B6 (p = .002); and 10.2, 9.3, and 8.7 ng/mL for folate (p = .03). Frail women were more likely to have at least two or more micronutrient deficiencies (p = .05). The age-adjusted odds ratios of being frail were significantly higher for those participants whose micronutrient concentrations were in the lowest quartile compared to the top three quartiles for total carotenoids, α-tocopherol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin B6. The association between nutrients and frailty was strongest for β-carotene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and total carotenoids (odds ratio ranging from 1.82 to 2.45, p = .05), after adjusting for age, sociodemographic status, smoking status, and body mass index. Conclusion. Frail women are more likely to have relatively low serum carotenoid and micronutrient concentrations and are more likely to have multiple micronutrient deficiencies. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine the relationships between micronutrient concentrations and frailty in older women.",
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AB - Objective. We investigated the relationship of micronutrient deficiencies with the frailty syndrome in older women living in the community. Methods. Frailty status and serum micronutrients were assessed in a cross-sectional study of 754 women, 70-80 years old, from the Women's Health and Aging Studies I and II. Results. Among nonfrail, prefrail, and frail women, respectively, geometric mean serum concentrations were 1.842, 1.593, and 1.376 μmol/L for total carotenoids (p <.001); 2.66, 2.51, and 2.43 μmol/L for retinol (p = .04); 50.9, 47.4, and 43.8 nmol/L for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p = .019); 43.0, 35.8, and 30.9 nmol/L for vitamin B6 (p = .002); and 10.2, 9.3, and 8.7 ng/mL for folate (p = .03). Frail women were more likely to have at least two or more micronutrient deficiencies (p = .05). The age-adjusted odds ratios of being frail were significantly higher for those participants whose micronutrient concentrations were in the lowest quartile compared to the top three quartiles for total carotenoids, α-tocopherol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and vitamin B6. The association between nutrients and frailty was strongest for β-carotene, lutein/zeaxanthin, and total carotenoids (odds ratio ranging from 1.82 to 2.45, p = .05), after adjusting for age, sociodemographic status, smoking status, and body mass index. Conclusion. Frail women are more likely to have relatively low serum carotenoid and micronutrient concentrations and are more likely to have multiple micronutrient deficiencies. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine the relationships between micronutrient concentrations and frailty in older women.

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