Vitamin A-sensitive tissues in transgenic mice expressing high levels of human cellular retinol-binding protein type I are not altered phenotypically

Gunhild Trøen, Winnie Eskild, Sigurd H. Fromm, Luigi M. De Luca, David E. Ong, Sarah A. Wardlaw, Sjur Reppe, Rune Blomhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The suggested function of cellular retinol-binding protein type I [CRBP(I)] is to carry retinol to esterifying or oxidizing enzymes. The retinyl esters are used in storage or transport, whereas oxidized forms such as all-trans or 9-cis retinoic acid are metabolites used in the mechanism of action of vitamin A. Thus, high expression of human CRBP(I) [hCRBP(I)] in transgenic mice might be expected to increase the production of retinoic acid in tissues, thereby inducing a phenotype resembling vitamin A toxicity. Alternatively, a vitamin A-deficient phenotype could also be envisioned as a result of an increased accumulation of vitamin A in storage cells induced by a high hCRBP(I) level. Signs of vitamin A toxicity or deficiency were therefore examined in tissues from transgenic mice with ectopic expression of hCRBP(I). TeStis and intestine, the tissues with the highest expression of the transgene, showed normal gross morphology. Similarly, no abnormalities were observed in other tissues known to be sensitive to vitamin A status such as cornea and retina, and the epithelia in the cervix, trachea and skin. Furthermore, hematologic variables known to be influenced by vitamin A status such as the hemoglobin concentration, hematocrits and the number of red blood cells were within normal ranges in the transgenic mice. In conclusion, these transgenic mice have normal function of vitamin A despite high expression of hCRBP(I) in several tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1621-1627
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume129
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cellular retinol-binding protein I
  • Transgenic mice
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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