Vitamin A deficiency as a preventable cause of maternal mortality in undernourished societies: Plausibility and next steps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Maternal vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in the developing world. Recent evidence from Nepal suggests that supplementing populations of rural, poor, and undernourished women with a recommended dietary amount of vitamin A - or its equivalent as beta-carotene - can lower mortality risk related to pregnancy and childbirth, presumably by reducing the severity of conditions such as sepsis, tuberculosis, and diarrheal diseases. An adequate intake of beta-carotene may also reduce some maternal health risks related to oxidative stress. These findings reveal the potential for vitamin A and other micronutrient interventions to improve maternal and infant health and survival. They also present important implementation challenges for the developing world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S24-S27
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume85
Issue number1 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Diet
  • Food fortification
  • Maternal vitamin A deficiency
  • Micronutrient supplementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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