Vitamin A and immunity to viral, bacterial and protozoan infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studies in animal models and cell lines show that vitamin A and related retinoids play a major role in immunity, including expression of mucins and keratins, lymphopoiesis, apoptosis, cytokine expression, production of antibody, and the function of neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes or macrophages, T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes. Recent clinical trials suggest that vitamin A supplementation reduces morbidity and mortality in different infectious diseases, such as measles, diarrhoeal disease, measles-related pneumonia, human immunodeficiency virus infection and malaria. Immune responses vary considerably during different infections, and the available data suggest that the modulation of immune function by vitamin A may also vary widely, depending on the type of infection and immune responses involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-727
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Nutrition Society
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999

Keywords

  • Immunity
  • Infection
  • Malaria
  • Measles
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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