Visual hallucinations in patients from an ophthalmology clinic and medical clinic population

Suzanne Holroyd, Peter V. Rabins, Daniel Finkelstein, Martina Lavrisha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although visual hallucinations have been associated with patients with visual disorders, no study has specifically examined whether visual hallucinations are indeed more prevalent than in a general medical population. In this study, 127 consecutive visual disorder patients and 100 consecutive general medical patients were screened for complex visual hallucinations. A total of 6.3% of visual disorder patients and 2% of general medical patients had visual hallucinations. Interestingly, the two medical patients with visual hallucinations also had visual disorders. Factors significantly associated with visual hallucinations were female sex (p =.029) and lower cognitive score (p =.001). Data from a previous study of patients with the visual disorder age-related macular degeneration were combined with this study to increase the sample size of visual hallucinators. Factors significantly associated with visual hallucinations in the combined sample were female sex (p =.015), living alone (pi =.019), having hearing problems (p =.047), older age (p =.013), and lower cognitive score (p <.001). Implications and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-276
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume182
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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