Visits Coded as Intimate Partner Violence in Emergency Departments: Characteristics of the Individuals and the System as Reported in a National Survey of Emergency Departments

Rula Btoush, Jacquelyn C Campbell, Kristine M. Gebbie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: This study was conducted to explore the characteristics of intimate partner violence (IPV) victims whose visit was coded as IPV and the health care delivery system in emergency departments (ED). Methods: This study utilized a secondary data analysis of a national probability sample that comprised the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 to 2001. Results: There were 111 coded ED visits of IPV victims 16 years or older (equivalent of 482,979 out of 4 million national visits for the 5-year study period). Women (94%), African Americans (35%), those 25 to 44 years of age (64%), and uninsured patients (38%) were significantly more likely to be categorized as an IPV visit (odds ratios 14, 1.9, 2.7, and 2.4, respectively) compared with non-IPV visits. Characteristics of the health care delivery system (region, metropolitan vs. non-metropolitan, type of hospital, and type of health care provider) were not associated with IPV. Discussion: Caution should be implemented when interpreting the study results because they represent only coded IPV visits in the emergency department. The study findings suggest the critical need to improve identification, documentation, and coding of IPV visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-427
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Emergency Nursing
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Hospital Emergency Service
Delivery of Health Care
Health Care Surveys
Sampling Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Intimate Partner Violence
Violence
Documentation
African Americans
Health Personnel
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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title = "Visits Coded as Intimate Partner Violence in Emergency Departments: Characteristics of the Individuals and the System as Reported in a National Survey of Emergency Departments",
abstract = "Introduction: This study was conducted to explore the characteristics of intimate partner violence (IPV) victims whose visit was coded as IPV and the health care delivery system in emergency departments (ED). Methods: This study utilized a secondary data analysis of a national probability sample that comprised the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997 to 2001. Results: There were 111 coded ED visits of IPV victims 16 years or older (equivalent of 482,979 out of 4 million national visits for the 5-year study period). Women (94{\%}), African Americans (35{\%}), those 25 to 44 years of age (64{\%}), and uninsured patients (38{\%}) were significantly more likely to be categorized as an IPV visit (odds ratios 14, 1.9, 2.7, and 2.4, respectively) compared with non-IPV visits. Characteristics of the health care delivery system (region, metropolitan vs. non-metropolitan, type of hospital, and type of health care provider) were not associated with IPV. Discussion: Caution should be implemented when interpreting the study results because they represent only coded IPV visits in the emergency department. The study findings suggest the critical need to improve identification, documentation, and coding of IPV visits.",
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