Viruses and the brain: From inflammation to dementia

Tongguang Wang, Jeffrey A. Rumbaugh, Avindra Nath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many viruses cause encephalitis, but understanding the mechanisms by which viral infection leads to encephalopathy or dementia remain elusive. In many cases, inflammation generated by the host's attempt to combat the infection is itself implicated as a primary factor in causing neuronal dysfunction or degeneration. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of CNS (central nervous system) injury in viral infection. We focus our review on the neuropathogenesis of HIV type I (HIV-I)-associated dementia, because, within this class of infection, it is the best studied. We will also discuss the key similarities and differences in the pathological mechanisms of other important viral encephalitides. Understanding these mechanisms should ultimately enable development of immunomodulatory therapies for treating these infections, as well as other neuro-inflammatory conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-407
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Science
Volume110
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Encephalitis
Dementia
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Infection
Encephalitis Viruses
Viral Encephalitis
Nervous System Trauma
Immunomodulation
Brain Diseases
HIV-1
Central Nervous System
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Encephalitis
  • HIV
  • Immunomodulation
  • Inflammation
  • Neuropathogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Viruses and the brain : From inflammation to dementia. / Wang, Tongguang; Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A.; Nath, Avindra.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 110, No. 4, 04.2006, p. 393-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, T, Rumbaugh, JA & Nath, A 2006, 'Viruses and the brain: From inflammation to dementia', Clinical Science, vol. 110, no. 4, pp. 393-407. https://doi.org/10.1042/CS20050278
Wang, Tongguang ; Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A. ; Nath, Avindra. / Viruses and the brain : From inflammation to dementia. In: Clinical Science. 2006 ; Vol. 110, No. 4. pp. 393-407.
@article{47798dc883024305b6efe9e4e037f318,
title = "Viruses and the brain: From inflammation to dementia",
abstract = "Many viruses cause encephalitis, but understanding the mechanisms by which viral infection leads to encephalopathy or dementia remain elusive. In many cases, inflammation generated by the host's attempt to combat the infection is itself implicated as a primary factor in causing neuronal dysfunction or degeneration. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of CNS (central nervous system) injury in viral infection. We focus our review on the neuropathogenesis of HIV type I (HIV-I)-associated dementia, because, within this class of infection, it is the best studied. We will also discuss the key similarities and differences in the pathological mechanisms of other important viral encephalitides. Understanding these mechanisms should ultimately enable development of immunomodulatory therapies for treating these infections, as well as other neuro-inflammatory conditions.",
keywords = "Dementia, Encephalitis, HIV, Immunomodulation, Inflammation, Neuropathogenesis",
author = "Tongguang Wang and Rumbaugh, {Jeffrey A.} and Avindra Nath",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1042/CS20050278",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "110",
pages = "393--407",
journal = "Clinical Science",
issn = "0143-5221",
publisher = "Portland Press Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Viruses and the brain

T2 - From inflammation to dementia

AU - Wang, Tongguang

AU - Rumbaugh, Jeffrey A.

AU - Nath, Avindra

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Many viruses cause encephalitis, but understanding the mechanisms by which viral infection leads to encephalopathy or dementia remain elusive. In many cases, inflammation generated by the host's attempt to combat the infection is itself implicated as a primary factor in causing neuronal dysfunction or degeneration. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of CNS (central nervous system) injury in viral infection. We focus our review on the neuropathogenesis of HIV type I (HIV-I)-associated dementia, because, within this class of infection, it is the best studied. We will also discuss the key similarities and differences in the pathological mechanisms of other important viral encephalitides. Understanding these mechanisms should ultimately enable development of immunomodulatory therapies for treating these infections, as well as other neuro-inflammatory conditions.

AB - Many viruses cause encephalitis, but understanding the mechanisms by which viral infection leads to encephalopathy or dementia remain elusive. In many cases, inflammation generated by the host's attempt to combat the infection is itself implicated as a primary factor in causing neuronal dysfunction or degeneration. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of CNS (central nervous system) injury in viral infection. We focus our review on the neuropathogenesis of HIV type I (HIV-I)-associated dementia, because, within this class of infection, it is the best studied. We will also discuss the key similarities and differences in the pathological mechanisms of other important viral encephalitides. Understanding these mechanisms should ultimately enable development of immunomodulatory therapies for treating these infections, as well as other neuro-inflammatory conditions.

KW - Dementia

KW - Encephalitis

KW - HIV

KW - Immunomodulation

KW - Inflammation

KW - Neuropathogenesis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645572480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645572480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1042/CS20050278

DO - 10.1042/CS20050278

M3 - Article

C2 - 16526945

AN - SCOPUS:33645572480

VL - 110

SP - 393

EP - 407

JO - Clinical Science

JF - Clinical Science

SN - 0143-5221

IS - 4

ER -