Virology and clinical sequelae of drug-resistant HBV in HIV - HBV-coinfected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Several of the nucleoside/nucleotide analogues used to treat HIV also inhibit HBV replication, with lamivudine being the oldest of this group. Thus, prior to licensing of tenofovir, many HIV - HBV-coinfected individuals received lamivudine as the only drug active against HBV as part of an anti-HIV regimen, which set the stage for the emergence of drug-resistant HBV. In coinfected persons, lamivudine-resistant HBV develops more rapidly than in HBV-moninfected persons, but it is not known if this is true for the newer agents. Owing to overlapping reading frames of the HBV polymerase and surface antigens, drug-resistant changes in HBV Pol can lead to mutations in the envelope. This review will discuss studies of drug-resistant HBV in HIV-infected persons including drug-resistant mutations that have been identified and clinical sequelae of these mutations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-491
Number of pages5
JournalAntiviral therapy
Volume15
Issue number3 PART B
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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