Views of BRCA gene mutation carriers on preimplantation genetic diagnosis as a reproductive option for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

U. Menon, J. Harper, A. Sharma, L. Fraser, M. Burnell, K. El Masry, C. Rodeck, I. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In May 2006, the UK Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) approved use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for lower penetrance, late onset cancer susceptibility syndromes such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). This is the first report on views of BRCA gene mutation carriers on use of PGD for HBOC. Methods: Between December 2005 and February 2006, a postal survey of BRCA mutation carriers attending a Familial Cancer Clinic was undertaken. Results: Of 102 women sent questionnaires, 52 (51%) responded. Thirty-nine (75%) felt it was acceptable to offer PGD for HBOC. Fifteen (37.5%) of 40 who had completed their families would personally have considered PGD if it had been available. Only one of seven (14%) contemplating a future pregnancy would consider PGD. Eighteen (35%) wrote extensively about their concerns including increasing availability of effective treatment and good quality of life. Conclusions: The majority of BRCA gene mutation carriers are supportive of offering PGD to others, thus endorsing the HFEA decision. However, most women would not consider it personally. Concerns raised highlight the need for regular HFEA reviews of the licensing criteria, as HBOC may cease to be a "serious life threatening illness" in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1573-1577
Number of pages5
JournalHuman Reproduction
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • BRCA
  • Preimplantation diagnosis
  • Reproductive options

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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