Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation

Mary Lynne Reuss, T. Allen Merritt, Bruce R. Boynton, Mikko Hallman, Eileen E. Tyrala, Frank Clark, Marilee C Allen, Pamela Kimzey Donohue, Amy E. Dusman

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

To the Editor: A methodologic problem besets the evaluation of the appropriate health care for very premature infants — namely, the unaccounted-for heterogeneity in obstetrical and neonatal care received by these fetuses and infants. Unless this factor is taken into consideration, differences in outcome attributed to gestational age could, in fact, be due to gestational-age-dependent differences in the intensiveness of care. Dr. Allen and her colleagues (Nov. 25 issue)1 describe gestational-age-determined differences in the intensiveness of obstetrical care offered to fetuses in their cohort. They report that obstetricians tried to avoid performing cesarean sections at 22 to 24 weeks' gestation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1236
Number of pages3
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume330
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 28 1994

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Gestational Age
Pregnancy
Fetus
Premature Infants
Cesarean Section
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reuss, M. L., Merritt, T. A., Boynton, B. R., Hallman, M., Tyrala, E. E., Clark, F., ... Dusman, A. E. (1994). Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation. New England Journal of Medicine, 330(17), 1234-1236. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199404283301712

Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation. / Reuss, Mary Lynne; Merritt, T. Allen; Boynton, Bruce R.; Hallman, Mikko; Tyrala, Eileen E.; Clark, Frank; Allen, Marilee C; Donohue, Pamela Kimzey; Dusman, Amy E.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 330, No. 17, 28.04.1994, p. 1234-1236.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Reuss, ML, Merritt, TA, Boynton, BR, Hallman, M, Tyrala, EE, Clark, F, Allen, MC, Donohue, PK & Dusman, AE 1994, 'Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 330, no. 17, pp. 1234-1236. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199404283301712
Reuss ML, Merritt TA, Boynton BR, Hallman M, Tyrala EE, Clark F et al. Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation. New England Journal of Medicine. 1994 Apr 28;330(17):1234-1236. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199404283301712
Reuss, Mary Lynne ; Merritt, T. Allen ; Boynton, Bruce R. ; Hallman, Mikko ; Tyrala, Eileen E. ; Clark, Frank ; Allen, Marilee C ; Donohue, Pamela Kimzey ; Dusman, Amy E. / Viability of infants born at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 330, No. 17. pp. 1234-1236.
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