Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research

David Kaufman, Juli Murphy, Lori Ann Hamby Erby, Kathy Hudson, Joan Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Large cohort studies to investigate interactions between genes, environment, and lifestyle require large representative samples of the population. The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is uniquely positioned to carry out such research, with a large patient population and a sophisticated system of electronic medical records. As Veterans Affairs considers establishing a large database of genetic information and medical records for research purposes, a survey of 931 Veterans Affairs patients was carried out to measure their willingness to participate, what their concerns would be, and their preferences about some aspects of study design. Methods: A sample of veterans who receive Veterans Affairs health care was surveyed online in April and May of 2008. The proposed genomic study was described to respondents, who then were asked about their support for the study and willingness to participate, and their opinions about the study and some of its components. A descriptive analysis examined differences in attitudes among demographic groups, and whether general beliefs were associated with support or willingness to participate. Results: Most respondents (83%) said the database should definitely or probably be created, and overall, 71% said they would definitely or probably participate. Conclusion: Majorities of Veterans Affairs health patients in a broad range of demographic groups supported the establishment of a genomic database and showed willingness to participate. Although the desire to learn about one's own health from the study was high, altruistic characteristics were strongly related to whether or not veterans would participate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-337
Number of pages9
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Fingerprint

Veterans
Veterans Health
Databases
Research
Demography
Genetic Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Gene-Environment Interaction
Electronic Health Records
Population
Medical Records
Biomedical Research
Life Style
Cohort Studies
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Genomics
  • Public opinion
  • Public policy
  • United States Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Kaufman, D., Murphy, J., Erby, L. A. H., Hudson, K., & Scott, J. (2009). Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research. Genetics in Medicine, 11(5), 329-337. https://doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e31819994f8

Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research. / Kaufman, David; Murphy, Juli; Erby, Lori Ann Hamby; Hudson, Kathy; Scott, Joan.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 5, 05.2009, p. 329-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaufman, D, Murphy, J, Erby, LAH, Hudson, K & Scott, J 2009, 'Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research', Genetics in Medicine, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 329-337. https://doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e31819994f8
Kaufman, David ; Murphy, Juli ; Erby, Lori Ann Hamby ; Hudson, Kathy ; Scott, Joan. / Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 329-337.
@article{366585ba04fe4bc7a9901ac427db9c6f,
title = "Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research",
abstract = "Purpose: Large cohort studies to investigate interactions between genes, environment, and lifestyle require large representative samples of the population. The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is uniquely positioned to carry out such research, with a large patient population and a sophisticated system of electronic medical records. As Veterans Affairs considers establishing a large database of genetic information and medical records for research purposes, a survey of 931 Veterans Affairs patients was carried out to measure their willingness to participate, what their concerns would be, and their preferences about some aspects of study design. Methods: A sample of veterans who receive Veterans Affairs health care was surveyed online in April and May of 2008. The proposed genomic study was described to respondents, who then were asked about their support for the study and willingness to participate, and their opinions about the study and some of its components. A descriptive analysis examined differences in attitudes among demographic groups, and whether general beliefs were associated with support or willingness to participate. Results: Most respondents (83{\%}) said the database should definitely or probably be created, and overall, 71{\%} said they would definitely or probably participate. Conclusion: Majorities of Veterans Affairs health patients in a broad range of demographic groups supported the establishment of a genomic database and showed willingness to participate. Although the desire to learn about one's own health from the study was high, altruistic characteristics were strongly related to whether or not veterans would participate.",
keywords = "Genomics, Public opinion, Public policy, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans",
author = "David Kaufman and Juli Murphy and Erby, {Lori Ann Hamby} and Kathy Hudson and Joan Scott",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1097/GIM.0b013e31819994f8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "329--337",
journal = "Genetics in Medicine",
issn = "1098-3600",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Veterans' attitudes regarding a database for genomic research

AU - Kaufman, David

AU - Murphy, Juli

AU - Erby, Lori Ann Hamby

AU - Hudson, Kathy

AU - Scott, Joan

PY - 2009/5

Y1 - 2009/5

N2 - Purpose: Large cohort studies to investigate interactions between genes, environment, and lifestyle require large representative samples of the population. The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is uniquely positioned to carry out such research, with a large patient population and a sophisticated system of electronic medical records. As Veterans Affairs considers establishing a large database of genetic information and medical records for research purposes, a survey of 931 Veterans Affairs patients was carried out to measure their willingness to participate, what their concerns would be, and their preferences about some aspects of study design. Methods: A sample of veterans who receive Veterans Affairs health care was surveyed online in April and May of 2008. The proposed genomic study was described to respondents, who then were asked about their support for the study and willingness to participate, and their opinions about the study and some of its components. A descriptive analysis examined differences in attitudes among demographic groups, and whether general beliefs were associated with support or willingness to participate. Results: Most respondents (83%) said the database should definitely or probably be created, and overall, 71% said they would definitely or probably participate. Conclusion: Majorities of Veterans Affairs health patients in a broad range of demographic groups supported the establishment of a genomic database and showed willingness to participate. Although the desire to learn about one's own health from the study was high, altruistic characteristics were strongly related to whether or not veterans would participate.

AB - Purpose: Large cohort studies to investigate interactions between genes, environment, and lifestyle require large representative samples of the population. The Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is uniquely positioned to carry out such research, with a large patient population and a sophisticated system of electronic medical records. As Veterans Affairs considers establishing a large database of genetic information and medical records for research purposes, a survey of 931 Veterans Affairs patients was carried out to measure their willingness to participate, what their concerns would be, and their preferences about some aspects of study design. Methods: A sample of veterans who receive Veterans Affairs health care was surveyed online in April and May of 2008. The proposed genomic study was described to respondents, who then were asked about their support for the study and willingness to participate, and their opinions about the study and some of its components. A descriptive analysis examined differences in attitudes among demographic groups, and whether general beliefs were associated with support or willingness to participate. Results: Most respondents (83%) said the database should definitely or probably be created, and overall, 71% said they would definitely or probably participate. Conclusion: Majorities of Veterans Affairs health patients in a broad range of demographic groups supported the establishment of a genomic database and showed willingness to participate. Although the desire to learn about one's own health from the study was high, altruistic characteristics were strongly related to whether or not veterans would participate.

KW - Genomics

KW - Public opinion

KW - Public policy

KW - United States Department of Veterans Affairs

KW - Veterans

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67249087182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67249087182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/GIM.0b013e31819994f8

DO - 10.1097/GIM.0b013e31819994f8

M3 - Article

C2 - 19346960

AN - SCOPUS:67249087182

VL - 11

SP - 329

EP - 337

JO - Genetics in Medicine

JF - Genetics in Medicine

SN - 1098-3600

IS - 5

ER -