Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013

Olivia Belt, Korene Stamatakos, Amanda J. Ayers, Victoria A. Fryer, David H. Jernigan, Michael Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Aims: There has been insufficient research attention to the alcohol industry's use of corporate sponsorship as a marketing tool. This paper provides a systematic investigation of the nature and extent of alcohol sponsorship-at the brand level-in the United States. Methods: The study examined sponsorship of organizations and events in the United States by alcohol brands from 2010 to 2013. The top 75 brands of alcohol consumed by underage drinkers were identified based on a previously conducted national internet-based survey. For each of these brands, a systematic search for sponsorships was conducted using Google. The sponsorships were coded by category and type of sponsorship. Results: We identified 945 sponsorships during the study period for the top 75 brands consumed by underage drinkers. The most popular youth brands were far more likely to engage in sponsorship and to have a higher number of sponsorships. The identified sponsorships overwhelmingly associated alcohol brands with integral aspects of American culture, including sports, music, the arts and entertainment, and drinking itself. The most popular brands among underage drinkers were much more likely to associate their brands with these aspects of American culture than brands that were less popular among underage drinkers. Conclusions: Alcohol brand sponsorship must be viewed as a major alcohol marketing strategy that generates brand capital through positive associations with integral aspects of culture, creation of attractive brand personalities, and identification with specific market segments. Alcohol research, practice and policy should address this highly prevalent form of alcohol marketing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1977-1985
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume109
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Alcohols
Organizations
Research
Marketing
Music
Art
Internet
Drinking
Sports
Personality
Industry
Economics

Keywords

  • Alcohol industry
  • Alcohol policy
  • Brand
  • Corporate
  • Marketing
  • Sponsorship
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013. / Belt, Olivia; Stamatakos, Korene; Ayers, Amanda J.; Fryer, Victoria A.; Jernigan, David H.; Siegel, Michael.

In: Addiction, Vol. 109, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 1977-1985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belt, Olivia ; Stamatakos, Korene ; Ayers, Amanda J. ; Fryer, Victoria A. ; Jernigan, David H. ; Siegel, Michael. / Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013. In: Addiction. 2014 ; Vol. 109, No. 12. pp. 1977-1985.
@article{586e82e389704aeabe8c971da6db385c,
title = "Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013",
abstract = "Background and Aims: There has been insufficient research attention to the alcohol industry's use of corporate sponsorship as a marketing tool. This paper provides a systematic investigation of the nature and extent of alcohol sponsorship-at the brand level-in the United States. Methods: The study examined sponsorship of organizations and events in the United States by alcohol brands from 2010 to 2013. The top 75 brands of alcohol consumed by underage drinkers were identified based on a previously conducted national internet-based survey. For each of these brands, a systematic search for sponsorships was conducted using Google. The sponsorships were coded by category and type of sponsorship. Results: We identified 945 sponsorships during the study period for the top 75 brands consumed by underage drinkers. The most popular youth brands were far more likely to engage in sponsorship and to have a higher number of sponsorships. The identified sponsorships overwhelmingly associated alcohol brands with integral aspects of American culture, including sports, music, the arts and entertainment, and drinking itself. The most popular brands among underage drinkers were much more likely to associate their brands with these aspects of American culture than brands that were less popular among underage drinkers. Conclusions: Alcohol brand sponsorship must be viewed as a major alcohol marketing strategy that generates brand capital through positive associations with integral aspects of culture, creation of attractive brand personalities, and identification with specific market segments. Alcohol research, practice and policy should address this highly prevalent form of alcohol marketing.",
keywords = "Alcohol industry, Alcohol policy, Brand, Corporate, Marketing, Sponsorship, Youth",
author = "Olivia Belt and Korene Stamatakos and Ayers, {Amanda J.} and Fryer, {Victoria A.} and Jernigan, {David H.} and Michael Siegel",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/add.12727",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "109",
pages = "1977--1985",
journal = "Addiction",
issn = "0965-2140",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013

AU - Belt, Olivia

AU - Stamatakos, Korene

AU - Ayers, Amanda J.

AU - Fryer, Victoria A.

AU - Jernigan, David H.

AU - Siegel, Michael

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Background and Aims: There has been insufficient research attention to the alcohol industry's use of corporate sponsorship as a marketing tool. This paper provides a systematic investigation of the nature and extent of alcohol sponsorship-at the brand level-in the United States. Methods: The study examined sponsorship of organizations and events in the United States by alcohol brands from 2010 to 2013. The top 75 brands of alcohol consumed by underage drinkers were identified based on a previously conducted national internet-based survey. For each of these brands, a systematic search for sponsorships was conducted using Google. The sponsorships were coded by category and type of sponsorship. Results: We identified 945 sponsorships during the study period for the top 75 brands consumed by underage drinkers. The most popular youth brands were far more likely to engage in sponsorship and to have a higher number of sponsorships. The identified sponsorships overwhelmingly associated alcohol brands with integral aspects of American culture, including sports, music, the arts and entertainment, and drinking itself. The most popular brands among underage drinkers were much more likely to associate their brands with these aspects of American culture than brands that were less popular among underage drinkers. Conclusions: Alcohol brand sponsorship must be viewed as a major alcohol marketing strategy that generates brand capital through positive associations with integral aspects of culture, creation of attractive brand personalities, and identification with specific market segments. Alcohol research, practice and policy should address this highly prevalent form of alcohol marketing.

AB - Background and Aims: There has been insufficient research attention to the alcohol industry's use of corporate sponsorship as a marketing tool. This paper provides a systematic investigation of the nature and extent of alcohol sponsorship-at the brand level-in the United States. Methods: The study examined sponsorship of organizations and events in the United States by alcohol brands from 2010 to 2013. The top 75 brands of alcohol consumed by underage drinkers were identified based on a previously conducted national internet-based survey. For each of these brands, a systematic search for sponsorships was conducted using Google. The sponsorships were coded by category and type of sponsorship. Results: We identified 945 sponsorships during the study period for the top 75 brands consumed by underage drinkers. The most popular youth brands were far more likely to engage in sponsorship and to have a higher number of sponsorships. The identified sponsorships overwhelmingly associated alcohol brands with integral aspects of American culture, including sports, music, the arts and entertainment, and drinking itself. The most popular brands among underage drinkers were much more likely to associate their brands with these aspects of American culture than brands that were less popular among underage drinkers. Conclusions: Alcohol brand sponsorship must be viewed as a major alcohol marketing strategy that generates brand capital through positive associations with integral aspects of culture, creation of attractive brand personalities, and identification with specific market segments. Alcohol research, practice and policy should address this highly prevalent form of alcohol marketing.

KW - Alcohol industry

KW - Alcohol policy

KW - Brand

KW - Corporate

KW - Marketing

KW - Sponsorship

KW - Youth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920280474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920280474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/add.12727

DO - 10.1111/add.12727

M3 - Article

C2 - 25384933

AN - SCOPUS:84920280474

VL - 109

SP - 1977

EP - 1985

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 12

ER -